Articles on Algae

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We think of coral reefs as a diverse ecosystem, but each coral is an entire and complex microworld of organisms imperceptible to our eyes. Floriaan Devloo-Delva

What we have in common with corals and their unexplored microbial world

Just like humans, corals live with myriad microscopic organisms. We are just starting to understand this unseen world.
A mass proliferation of Noctiluca scintillans, a red tide forming dinoflagellate at Clovelly Beach, NSW. It can form dense aggregations that deplete oxygen and produce ammonia. Gurjeet Kohli

Collecting data to help protect Australia’s waters from toxic algal blooms

They give us part of the air we breathe but microscopic phytoplankton can also be toxic. They are also on the move thanks to climate change so a new Australian database hopes to monitor any changes.
Bleached coral can take on luminously beautiful pink and purple hues - but don’t be deceived, these corals are under stress. Justin Marshall/coralwatch.org

In pictures: a close-up look at the Great Barrier Reef’s bleaching

The bleaching hitting the Great Barrier Reef not only harms corals. As these close-up photos show, it also deprives many other species of a home and livelihood.
The vivid pink pools of Western Australia’s Hutt Lagoon are the world’s largest algae farm. Steve Back (used with permission)

Sustainable oil from algae: the technology is ready, but what about the politics?

We have the technology to make oil from algae, rather than digging up crude oil from organisms that lived billions of years ago. But bringing it to market will take a force of economic and political will.
Spot the algae. NASA

Visualising algae-eating viruses from space

Algae isn’t just found in your garden pond or local river. Sometimes it explodes into vast “blooms” far out to sea, that can be the size of a small country. Such algal blooms can match even a rainforest…

Insomniac algae more productive

Algae can produce up to 700% more compounds when tricked to stay awake, according to new research conducted by Vanderbilt…
These blue-green algae - cyanobacteria - would be the only winners from a warming ocean. Joydeep

If warming oceans leave algae hungry, we’ll go hungry too

Global warming is having a significant impact on marine life, as many marine organisms are adapted to live only within the average temperature range of their habitats. This applies to larger fish and sea…
Show me the green: Tetraselmis suecica algae viewed under a confocal microscope. Emily Roberts/Swansea University

The next ‘black gold’ could be green

Leave a glass with nutrient-rich pond water on a sunny window sill and within a day or two it will have turned a very vibrant, verdant green. This apparent alchemy has less to do with chemistry and more…
Algal genes are introduced into tobacco cells that grow into plants. Peggy Lemaux/UC Berkeley

Tobacco re-imagined as a future fuel source

Tobacco doesn’t immediately conjure up ideas of fuel for cars and planes. But that’s precisely what a three-year, $4.8m project from the US Department of Energy’s ARPA-E PETRO (Plants Engineered to Replace…

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