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Articles on Data privacy

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A Grade 6 student takes part in a virtual school session with her teacher and classmates via Zoom from her home in Vancouver, April 2, 2020. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward)

Children’s privacy is at risk with rapid shifts to online schooling under coronavirus

Children in our schools are the latest at risk in a brave new age of surveillance and data control that is being catalyzed by hasty educational technology decisions under COVID-19.
In an era of data breaches and privacy intrusions, the majority of Canadians want paper bills. So why aren’t organizations listening to them? (Shutterstock)

A plea to businesses: Don’t take away our paper bills!

In an era of data breaches and data privacy concerns, governments should enshrine in law a requirement for companies and banks to send paper bills and statements in order to protect consumers.
A U.S. Census Bureau staff member uses digital maps to help identify where people live and need to be counted. U.S. Census Bureau via AP

The census goes digital – 3 things to know

Collecting census data online creates new risks to the accuracy and integrity of the information. Here's what to be aware of.
You leave bits of your personal data behind online, and companies are happy to trade in them. metamorworks/ iStock/Getty Images Plus

AI could constantly scan the internet for data privacy violations, a quicker, easier way to enforce compliance

Data privacy regulations are being adopted to protect internet users. Today, humans need to read those rules to ensure compliance. New research suggests machines could interpret them in real time.
Of the 23 recommendations made in the ACCC’s final report, the government supported six in their entirety, ten “in principle”, “noted” five and rejected two. shutterstock

The federal government’s response to the ACCC’s Digital Platforms Inquiry is a let down

The ACCC's inquiry was launched to address concerns about the market power of major digital platforms, such as Google and Facebook, and their impact on Australia's businesses and media.
While leaks and whistleblowers continue to be valuable tools in the fight for data privacy, we can’t rely on them solely to keep big tech companies in check. SHUTTERSTOCK

The ugly truth: tech companies are tracking and misusing our data, and there’s little we can do

Most of us are probably having our data tracked in some form. And while there are regulatory safeguards in place to protect user privacy, it's hard to say whether these are enough.
DNA database giant Ancestry lets members access international records including the convict and free settler lists, passenger lists, Australian and New Zealand electoral rolls and military records. Patrick Alexander/Flickr

If you’ve given your DNA to a DNA database, US police may now have access to it

A US judge has allowed police access to the major DNA database without users' consent (including Australian users). It's a timely reminder that we urgently need genetic privacy legislation.
User agreements are often long, complex and inaccessible texts that don’t help users understand what exactly is being done with their information. Shutterstock

Plain language about health data is essential for transparency and trust

As more data are collected, it's important for the public to understand how their health information is being used. But user agreements are often complex, lengthy and written in inaccessible language.
Is privacy what you can’t see, or where you don’t look? Kamil Macniak/Shutterstock.com

What’s private depends on who you are and where you live

Privacy starts with the body and extends to digital data. There are few rules governing what companies can do – yet people can't effectively protect their own privacy.

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