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Articles on First Nations

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Two people embrace in front of the Centennial Flame on Parliament Hill, in Ottawa at a memorial for the 215 children whose remains were found at the grounds of the former Kamloops Indian Residential School. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Justin Tang

Unmarked graves of 215 Indigenous children were found in Kamloops a year ago: What’s happened since? — Podcast

In today’s episode of Don’t Call Me Resilient, we take a look at what has happened since the unmarked graves of 215 Indigenous children were found in Kamloops B.C.
A group of Greek migrants at a picnic in the outskirts of Melbourne in 1936. La Trobe Greek Archives

A brief (political) history of Australian picnics

Far from just a gathering with friends, Australian picnics have long been associated with the political – from trade unions to feminist resistance.
AFN Regional Chief Cindy Woodhouse and Indigenous Services Minister Patty Hajdu listen to Crown-Indigenous Relations Minister Marc Miller as he responds to a question during a news conference on Jan. 4, 2022, in Ottawa. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld

As a lawyer who’s helped fight for the rights of First Nations children, here’s what you need to know about the $40B child welfare agreements

In the next year, public support will be needed more than ever to ensure that the spirit of the agreement is respected and translated into meaningful change for First Nations children.
Canadian Taxpayers Federation former Federal Director Aaron Wudrick announces the winners of the 18th annual Teddy Waste Awards during a news conference on Parliament Hill in 2016. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld

The Canadian Taxpayers Federation’s politics are anti-Indigenous — so why do media outlets still quote them?

When the media consults the CTF, it demonstrates contemporary hostility towards Indigenous nations. Viewing the CTF’s advocacy as a whole demonstrates their orientation very clearly.
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Technology-facilitated abuse of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women is rife in regional and remote areas

First Nations women are disproportionately more likely to be targets of online abuse. More needs to be done to respond to and support women experiencing technology-facilitated abuse.
Grey Owl was an original ‘pretendian,’ portraying himself as the the son of a Scottish man and Apache woman after moving to Canada in the early 1900s. (Canadian National Railways/Library and Archives Canada, e010861684)

Fraudulent claims of indigeneity: Indigenous nations are the identity experts

Those quick to call-out are often not clamouring for Indigenous nations’ jurisdiction over citizenship, nor are they demanding “pretendians” be held accountable to Indigenous nations.
New Brunswick Aboriginal Affairs Minister Arlene Dunn and Premier Blaine Higgs speak with the media as part of National Indigenous Peoples Day in Fredericton on June 21, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Stephen MacGillivray

New Brunswick ban on land acknowledgements is a death blow to nation-to-nation relationships

If senior ministers of the Crown in New Brunswick responsible for Indigenous relations cannot accept or acknowledge Indigenous sovereignty, then surely nation-to-nation must be dead.
In this episode, two Indigenous scientists offer a different theory of pollution — one that includes colonialism at its root. This understanding may help us make a better future. Here, logging activities in Australia. Matt Palmer/Unsplash

Why pollution is as much about colonialism as chemicals — Don’t Call Me Resilient transcript EP 11

Colonialism is manifested by the way pollution impacts the lives of Indigenous peoples in Canada. Two Indigenous environmental scientists discuss how they’ve overcome obstacles in their research.

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