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After this episode, you’ll be able to explain how quantum mechanics affects everything from the way your jeans are cut to the headphones you use. Cindy Zhi/The Conversation NY-BD-CC

Trust Me, I’m An Expert: The explainer episode

The explainer episode. The Conversation, CC BY67.5 MB (download)
Today on Trust me, I'm An Expert, we're explaining the tricky topics: what is quantum mechanics? What does the research say about lone actor terrorism? And why do people like pimple popping videos?
Ben Quilty, Life vest, Lesbos. 2016, oil on polyester, 60 x 50cm. Australian War Memorial

Essays On Air: can art really make a difference?

Essays on Air: can art really make a difference? The Conversation26.8 MB (download)
Art has always depicted the crimes of our times throughout centuries of wars and humanitarian crises. Can we really expect it to truly make a difference in the real world?
LunaseeStudios/Shutterstock.com

The Good Friday Agreement in Northern Ireland at 20 – The Anthill podcast

To mark the 20th anniversary of the agreement that brought peace to Northern Ireland, this episode of the podcast looks at its history, its legacy and the impact of Brexit on its future.
Evidence isn’t always as straightforward as it might first seem. Mai Lam/The Conversation NY-BD-CC

Trust Me, I’m An Expert: Brain-zapping, the curious case of the n-rays and other stories of evidence

Brain-zapping, the curious case of the n-rays and other stories of evidence. The Conversation, CC BY70.4 MB (download)
You've had an x-ray before but have you had an n-ray? Of course not, because they're not real. But people used to think they were. Today, on Trust Me, I'm an Expert, we're bringing you stories on the theme of evidence.
The Loch Ness Monster and other folk tales might not be pure fiction, but actually based on memories of events our ancestors once observed. Shutterstock

Essays On Air: Monsters in my closet – how a geographer began mining myths

Essays On Air: Monsters in my closet - how a geographer began mining myths.
So you think the Loch Ness Monster never existed? Think again. Traditional myths from our ancestors might actually reveal important clues about the geological history of the world.
Emergency personnel at the Ashley Wood Recovery Centre in Salisbury as the investigation into the suspected nerve agent attack on Russian double agent Sergei Skripal continues. PA Images

The story of the Novichok nerve agents – podcast

An audio version of an in depth article on the story of how the nerve agent used in an attack on former Russian spy Sergei Skripal was developed.
Why did this woman, so devoted to her political cause and to her vision of a united France, chose to be burnt at the stake at the age of 19 instead of acquiescing to her judges’ directives? shutterstock.com

Essays On Air: Joan of Arc, our one true superhero

Essays On Air: Joan of Arc, our one true superhero. The Conversation22.1 MB (download)
Joan of Arc has been depicted as a national heroine, nationalist symbol, a rebellious heretic and a goodly saint. Forget Wonder Woman and Batman – Jeanne d’Arc may be our one and only true superhero.
Pain lets us know when there is something wrong, but sometimes our brains can trick us. Mai Lam/The Conversation NY-BD-CC

Trust Me I’m An Expert: The science of pain

Trust Me I’m An Expert: The science of pain. The Conversation58.7 MB (download)
Our podcast Trust Me, I'm An Expert, goes beyond the headlines and asks researchers to explain the evidence on issues making news. Today, we're talking pain and what science says about managing it.
Marchers at the 1978 Mardi Gras parade. Sally Colechin/The Pride History Group

Essays On Air: On the Sydney Mardi Gras march of 1978

On the Sydney Mardi Gras march of 1978. The Conversation, CC BY31.7 MB (download)
On a cold Saturday night in Sydney on June 24, 1978, a number of gay men, lesbians and transgender people marched into the pages of Australian social history. I was one of them.
A nurse nun visits the graves of victims of a 1976 Ebola outbreak. Wikimedia Commons

Africa’s missing Ebola outbreaks – podcast

The audio version of a long read on the historical mistakes and cover ups that hampered the response to the devastating Ebola outbreak of 2014.
In July 2017, new research was published that pushed the opening chapters of Australian history back to 65,000 years ago. Marcella Cheng/The Conversation

Essays On Air: When did Australia’s human history begin?

When did Australia’s human history begin? The Conversation, CC BY16.6 MB (download)
Today's episode of Essays On Air, the audio version of our Friday essay series, seeks to move beyond the view of ancient Australia as a timeless and traditional foundation story.

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