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Antibiotics can be a wonder for treating bacterial infections – but we need to be cautious in how we use them. From shutterstock.com

Antibiotic resistant superbugs kill 32 plane-loads of people a week. We can all help fight back

Antibiotic resistant superbugs kill 32 plane-loads of people a week. We can all help fight back. The Conversation, CC BY48 MB (download)
Antibiotic resistant infections already kill about 700,000 people globally every year. While scientists are racing to find new ways to fight superbugs, there's one thing you can do, too.
Big Tech companies have built a better trap for profiting from consumers’ attention than the traditional media can offer. Shutterstock

Media Files: Media companies are mad as hell at tech giants and don’t want to take it anymore. But what choice do they have?

Media companies are mad as hell at tech giants and don’t want to take it anymore. But what choice do they have? The Conversation64.5 MB (download)
No wonder that, according to a new international survey, media companies are increasingly unhappy with their lot. In this episode we hear from the survey's author, Robert Whitehead.
Lithium ion batteries revolutionised the way we use, manufacture and charge our devices. They’re used to power mobile phones, laptops and even electric cars. Shutterstock

Nearly all your devices run on lithium batteries. Here’s a Nobel Prizewinner on his part in their invention – and their future

Nearly all your devices run on lithium batteries. Here’s a Nobel Prizewinner on his part in their invention – and their future. The Conversation41.5 MB (download)
M. Stanley Whittingham was one of three scientists who won the 2019 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for their work developing lithium-ion batteries – used to power mobile phones, laptops and electric cars.
This week’s Essential poll showed 56% of voters would prioritise stimulating the Australian economy over getting back to budget surplus. Mick Tsikas/AAP

Politics with Michelle Grattan: Ross Gittins on the government’s ‘surplus obsession’

Ross Gittins on the government’s “surplus obsession” The Conversation, CC BY29.3 MB (download)
As the Australian economy continues to struggle, many argue that stimulus is needed, urging the government to abandon its "surplus obsession".
The first report produced by Democracy 2025 brings forward the perspective of federal politicians, as they are key voices in the debate on trust in politics. Shutterstock

Politics with Michelle Grattan: On the trust divide in politics

On the trust divide in politics. The Conversation, CC BY50 MB (download)
Two of the authors of the first Democracy 2025 report discuss the keys findings about what politicians see as faults in the current political system, and how they think it can be improved.
The Deputy PM urges farmers considering leaving their farms to ‘take every bit of good advice available before they take that ultimate step’. Mick Tsikas/AAP

Politics with Michelle Grattan: Deputy PM Michael McCormack on the drought and restive Nationals

Deputy PM Michael McCormack on the drought and restive Nationals. The Conversation, CC BY33.7 MB (download)
Following tensions in the Nationals party room over the bring-forward of the dairy code for Pauline Hanson, the Deputy PM admits that the party leadership mishandled the situation.
Maggots are a major part of the puzzle when it comes to collecting forensic evidence. Shutterstock

Trust Me, I’m An Expert: forensic entomology, or what bugs can tell police about when someone died

Trust Me, I’m An Expert: forensic entomology, or what bugs can tell police about when someone died. The Conversation, CC BY58.8 MB (download)
James Wallman is one of Australia's few forensic entomologists. It’s his job to unpack the tiny clues left behind by insects that can help police solve crimes.
Some of Watts’ ancestors were deeply rooted in the old attitudes of “white Australia”, while his wife is from Hong Kong, and his children Eurasian-Australian. Erik Anderson/AAP

Politics with Michelle Grattan: Tim Watts on Australia’s changing identity

Tim Watts on Australia’s changing identity. The Conversation, CC BY37.7 MB (download)
Tim Watts joins Michelle Grattan to discuss his new book, The Golden Country, in which he reconciles his family's past and present, and explores the question of what it means to be Australian.
Heather Henderson and Mary Elizabeth Calwell reflect on their fathers’ legacies, growing up in a political environment, and offer their perspectives on a different era in politics. Office of Maria Vamvakinou MP

Politics with Michelle Grattan: daughters of Robert Menzies and Arthur Calwell say parliament wasn’t always a ‘fort’

Daughters of Robert Menzies and Arthur Calwell say parliament wasn’t always a “fort” The Conversation, CC BY79.2 MB (download)
Last week, Michelle Grattan moderated a very special discussion with the daughters of Menzies and Calwell at Parliament House. This podcast episode is a recording of that event.

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