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Almost 30 per cent of Black households and 50 per cent of Indigenous households experience food insecurity. Bart Heird/Unsplash

Making our food fairer: Don’t Call Me Resilient EP 12

Our food systems are failing to feed all of us. In this episode of Don’t Call Me Resilient, we pick apart what is broken and ways to fix it with two women who battle food injustice.
Scientist Michelle Murphy says we should ‘value wastelands …and injured life.’ Here, collected plastic from the shoreline of Hamilton, Ontario is sorted by colour. Jasmin Sessler/Unsplash

Why pollution is as much about colonialism as chemicals — Don’t Call Me Resilient EP 11

In this episode, two Indigenous scientists running collaborative labs to address our climate crisis offer some ideas for environmental justice, including a redefinition of pollution.
In this episode, two Indigenous scientists offer a different theory of pollution — one that includes colonialism at its root. This understanding may help us make a better future. Here, logging activities in Australia. Matt Palmer/Unsplash

Why pollution is as much about colonialism as chemicals — Don’t Call Me Resilient transcript EP 11

Colonialism is manifested by the way pollution impacts the lives of Indigenous peoples in Canada. Two Indigenous environmental scientists discuss how they’ve overcome obstacles in their research.
A CCTV camera sculpture in Toronto draws attention to the increasing surveillance in everyday life. Our guests discuss ways to resist this creeping culture. Lianhao Qu /Unsplash

Being Watched: How surveillance amplifies racist policing and threatens the right to protest — Don’t Call Me Resilient EP 10

Mass data collection and surveillance have become ubiquitous. For marginalized communities, the stakes of having their privacy violated are high.
A photo of art work by Banksy in London comments on the power imbalance of surveillance technology. Guests on this episode discuss how AI and Facial recognition have been flagged by civil rights leaders due to its inherent racial bias. Niv Singer/Unsplash

Being Watched: How surveillance amplifies racist policing and threatens the right to protest — Don’t Call Me Resilient EP 10 transcript

Once analysts gain access to our private data, they can use that information to influence and alter our behaviour and choices. If you’re marginalized in some way, the consequences are worse.
On Don’t Call Me Resilient, we speak with Satwinder Bains, associate professor and director of the South Asian Studies Institute at the University of the Fraser Valley and Maneet Chahal, co-founder of Soch Mental Health. (Claudia Wolff)

Model minority blues — The mental health consequences of being a model citizen: Don’t Call Me Resilient EP 9 transcript

Recently, Statistics Canada revealed that South Asians reported lower levels of mental health than any other Canadians during the pandemic.
In this episode, we discuss some of the reasons South Asians are reporting higher rates of mental health issues than any other group. Here a group of young South Asians at Besharam, a Toronto nightclub hosted by DJ Amita (pre-pandemic). courtesy Besharam

Model minority blues: The mental health consequences of being a model citizen — Don’t Call Me Resilient EP 9

The pressure of needing to be a model minority — successful, quiet, hardworking — can force people to internalize their mental anguish and ends up leaving gaps in our mental health services.
Queen’s University professor Celeste Pedri-Spade says a basic first question to determine identity is: ‘Who is your grandmother?“ Here a group of Métis children and two women sitting on a large rock, Fort Chipewyan, Alberta, 1931. H. S. Spence, Canada. Department of Mines and Technical Surveys. Library and Archives Canada, PA-014406 /

Stolen identities: What does it mean to be Indigenous? Don’t Call Me Resilient Podcast EP 8 Transcript

Transcript for Don’t Call Me Resilient Podcast EP 8: Stolen identities: What does it mean to be Indigenous?
Being Indigenous is more than just genealogy. Here Lorralene Whiteye from the Ojibway Nation checks her hair in a mirror before the start of a healing ceremony, held by Toronto Indigenous Harm Reduction, to commemorate the first National Day for Truth and Reconciliation in Toronto. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Evan Buhler

Stolen identities: What does it mean to be Indigenous? Don’t Call Me Resilient Podcast EP 8

In recent years, some prominent people have been called out for falsely claiming Indigenous identity. Why would someone falsely claim an identity? And what does it mean to be Indigenous?

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