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Articles on Teens

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Kids can ask the best questions. Yellow Dog Productions/DigitalVision via Getty Images

Why questions (good and bad) matter

Tolerating inquiry is essential even if there are such things as questions no one should ask.
Maitreyi Ramakrishnan, left, stars in Never Have I Ever as Devi, a delightful protagonist who has endearing, thoughtful friends with stories of their own, Fabiola (Lee Rodriguez), center, and Eleanor (Ramona Young), right. (Lara Solanki/Netflix)

Mindy Kaling’s ‘Never Have I Ever’ makes me feel hopeful about representation, gender and race

"Never Have I Ever" is a fresh, fun and poignant addition to television’s repertoire of coming-of-age stories, especially for stories of Indian teenage girls.
A pedestrian wearing a protective face mask walks past a nearly empty restaurant in New York City. John Minchillo/AP Photo

The coronavirus could be Generation Z’s 9/11

We don't know how long-lasting the effects of the virus will be, but the outbreak is already having a deep psychological impact on people and disrupting life on a massive scale.
Not all of Bernie Sanders’ young supporters are showing up at the polls. AP Photo/Matt Rourke

Why so few young Americans vote

Americans under 30 are far less likely to vote than older citizens. Stepping up civics instruction might help change that, a scholar explains.
Too much caffeine interferes with sleep. Luis Molinero/Shutterstock.com

Is it OK for teens to drink coffee?

Since caffeine is in so many different foods and drinks, it's easy for kids – or grownups – to get more than they should without realizing it.
Yolanda Renee King, the grandchild of Martin Luther King Jr., alongside Jaclyn Corin, a Parkland survivor and activist. AP Photo/Andrew Harnik

3 ways activist kids these days resemble their predecessors

These youngsters have ample fervor, and they are dramatically photogenic. Dismissing them as being fake or lightweight can spell trouble for members of the establishment.
Harnessing adolescents’ readiness to help can be good for them and their communities. YAKOBCHUK VIACHESLAV/Shutterstock.com

Adolescents have a fundamental need to contribute

Teens get a bad rap as selfish, dangerous risk-takers. But neuroscience and psychology research is revising that image: Adolescents are primed to help those around them, with positive benefits for all.

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