Articles on Trust Me, I'm an Expert

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Maggots are a major part of the puzzle when it comes to collecting forensic evidence. Shutterstock

Trust Me, I’m An Expert: forensic entomology, or what bugs can tell police about when someone died

Trust Me, I’m An Expert: forensic entomology, or what bugs can tell police about when someone died. The Conversation, CC BY58.8 MB (download)
James Wallman is one of Australia's few forensic entomologists. It’s his job to unpack the tiny clues left behind by insects that can help police solve crimes.
Have you been told by your doctor to consider dropping a few kilos? The good news is that often even a small amount of weight loss can improve your health outlook. shutterstock

Trust Me, I’m An Expert: what science says about how to lose weight and whether you really need to

What science says about how to lose weight and whether you really need to. The Conversation, CC BY49.3 MB (download)
A professor in nutrition and dietetics explains.
Are southern-born politicians talking about a state they essentially don’t understand? Shutterstock

Trust Me, I’m An Expert: Queensland still mystifies too many politicians but its needs are surprisingly simple

Queensland still mystifies too many politicians but its needs are surprisingly simple. The Conversation119 MB (download)
Two Queensland-based experts discuss what so many politicians and pundits get wrong about the Sunshine State – and what its citizens are crying out for.
Protesters holding umbrellas amid heavy rain march in an anti-government rally in Wan Chai, Hong Kong. AAP/EPA/VIVEK PRAKASH

Trust Me, I’m An Expert: Why the Hong Kong protesters feel they have nothing to lose

Why the Hong Kong protesters feel they have ‘nothing to lose’ The Conversation29.5 MB (download)
Hong Kong leader Carrie Lam has indicated she's open to dialogue. But unless she meets the demonstrators' demands, the protest movement isn't going to end anytime soon.
Research underway at the University of Technology, Sydney’s AFTER facility is yielding some surprising new findings about how bodies decompose in the Australian bush. Supplied by UTS

‘This is going to affect how we determine time since death’: how studying body donors in the bush is changing forensic science

‘This is going to affect how we determine time since death’: how studying body donors in the bush is changing forensic science. The Conversation, CC BY77.2 MB (download)
On the outskirts of Sydney, in a secret bushland location, lies what's officially known as the Australian Facility for Taphonomic Experimental Research. In books or movies, it'd be called a body farm.
Older private renters are far more likely to experience loneliness than their counterparts in social housing and that loneliness can be acute. Shutterstock

‘People felt totally trapped’: what it’s like to be a pensioner renting privately as Australia’s housing costs soar

‘People felt totally trapped’: what it’s like to be a pensioner renting privately as Australia’s housing costs soar. The Conversation, CC BY39 MB (download)
On today's episode, Alan Morris shares some of the deeply moving stories he heard when he set out to interview older Australians in private rental accommodation and social housing about loneliness.
A scene at the Aquarius Festival, Nimbin, 1973. Flickr/Harry Watson Smith, CC BY-SA

Nimbin before and after: local voices on how the 1973 Aquarius Festival changed a town forever

Nimbin before and after: local voices on how the 1973 Aquarius Festival changed a town forever. The Conversation, CC BY69.6 MB (download)
The stories shared with you today are drawn from consultations and interviews with more than 60 Nimbin residents, Aquarius Festival participants and Indigenous elders.
Political scientist Andy Marks says: ‘I’d suggest the momentum is with Labor and it hasn’t substantially shifted’. AAP Image/NIC ELLIS

‘Labor will win this election. I think that’s virtually unquestionable’: political scientist Andy Marks on #AusVotes2019 and the key issues in NSW

‘Labor will win this election. I think that’s virtually unquestionable’: political scientist Andy Marks on #AusVotes2019 and the key issues in NSW. The Conversation, CC BY34 MB (download)
We are but a few weeks from a federal election, and the way the political wind is blowing may depend on what state you're in.
Today we’re asking: what Queensland seats are the ones to watch on election night? How to give Indigenous Australians a true voice in politics? And how can we improve trust in the political system? Shutterstock

The myth of ‘the Queensland voter’, Australia’s trust deficit, and the path to Indigenous recognition

The myth of ‘the Queensland voter’, Australia’s trust deficit, and the path to Indigenous recognition. The Conversation122 MB (download)
Today, an election-themed episode about some of the biggest policy questions Australia faces, featuring Indigenous academic lawyer Eddie Synot and political scientist Anne Tiernan.
Mukurtu is a Warumungu word meaning “dilly bag” or a safe keeping place for sacred materials. Nina Maile Gordon/The Conversation CC-NY-BD

Mukurtu: an online dilly bag for keeping Indigenous digital archives safe

Mukurtu: an online dilly bag for keeping Indigenous digital archives safe. The Conversation71.5 MB (download)
Mukurtu - Warumungu word meaning 'dilly bag' or a safe keeping place for sacred materials - is an online system helping Indigenous people conserve photos, songs and other digital archives.
It’s a fight for a rapidly vanishing centre, which will make passing bills difficult for whoever wins. Chris Pavlich/Dean Lewins(AAP)

Mark Latham in the upper house? A Coalition minority government? The NSW election is nearly upon us and it’s going to be a wild ride

Mark Latham in the upper house? A Coalition minority government? The NSW election is nearly upon us, and it’s going to be a wild ride.
It's worth keeping an eye on the NSW election outcome. It may end up telling us a lot about how global political themes, like the erosion of centrist politics, are playing out here in Australia.
Shutterstock/AAP/The Conversartion

‘I think we should be very concerned’: A cyber crime expert on this week’s hack and what needs to happen next

‘I think we should be very concerned’: A cybercrime expert on this week’s hack and what needs to happen next. The Conversation38.8 MB (download)
This week, a 'sophisticated state actor' hacked the big Australian political parties. In today's episode, an expert on crime and technology says 'it's a given' that some will try to disrupt elections.
Prime Minister Scott Morrison and other Coalition MPs described Labor as weak on borders after the opposition and the crossbench voted to pass a bill allowing medical transfers from Manus and Nauru. AAP/Mick Tsikas

A refugee law expert on a week of ‘reckless’ rhetoric and a new way to process asylum seeker claims

A refugee law expert on a week of ‘reckless’ rhetoric and a new way to process asylum seeker claims. The Conversation44 MB (download)
Today on Trust Me, I'm An Expert, a refugee legal expert busts myths about how proposed medical transfer rules would work, and described some of this week's border security rhetoric as 'reckless'.
Today, experts reveal the tips and tricks spin doctors use to shape the political messages you’re hearing every day - especially during election campaigns. AAP Image/Mick Tsikas

Trust Me, I’m An Expert: how to spot the work of a political spin doctor this election season

How to spot the work of a political spin doctor this election season. The Conversation, CC BY77.6 MB (download)
There’s a small army of spin doctors behind the scenes of an election campaign, finessing every utterance so it fits with the overall strategy. Today's episode is all about the art of political spin.
Ready for all the research-backed tips and tricks for setting a goal and meeting it? www.shutterstock.com

Trust Me, I’m An Expert: What research says about how to stick to your New Year’s resolutions

What research says about how to stick to your New Year’s resolutions. The Conversation, CC BY82.9 MB (download)
Today, experts will be sharing with us insights into how to make a change in your life -- big or small -- using evidence from the world of academic research.
You know you’re not supposed to do this – but you do. Shutterstock

Trust Me, I’m An Expert: the science of sleep and the economics of sleeplessness

The science of sleep and the economics of sleeplessness. The Conversation, CC BY52.8 MB (download)
Only about one quarter Australians report getting eight or more hours of sleep. And in pre-industrial times, it was seen as normal to wake for a few hours in the middle of the night and chat or work.
What is in these products? And if additives don’t affect your health, would you care? Shutterstock

Trust Me, I’m An Expert: Food fraud, the centuries-old problem that won’t go away

Food fraud, the centuries-old problem that won’t go away. The Conversation55.8 MB (download)
Dairy farmers used to put sheep brains and chalk in skim milk to make it look frothier and whiter. Coffee, honey and wine have also been past targets of food fraudsters. Can the law ever keep up?
The Bureau of Meteorology’s tropical cyclone outlook is out today. AAP Image/Bureau of Meteorology, Japan Meteorological Agency

Trust Me, I’m An Expert: Cyclone season approacheth, but this year there’s a twist

Cyclone season approacheth, but this year there’s a twist. The Conversation, CC BY31.4 MB (download)
Australia must come to terms with some fundamental shifts in our weather patterns. This month, Andrew Watkins from the BOM and climate scientist Joelle Gergis explore what's in store.

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