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Articles on Zoonotic diseases

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Children and women run in a cloud of dust at the village of El Gel, Ethiopia. Climate change has pushed the Horn of Africa into a catastrophic drought. Photo by EDUARDO SOTERAS/AFP via Getty Images)

Climate change risks triggering a spike in infectious disease outbreaks: three reasons why

Heat, floods and droughts create conditions for pathogens and their vectors.
Museum specimens are like time capsules from where and when the organisms and their pathogens lived. Ed Maker/The Denver Post via Getty Images

Leprosy-causing bacteria found in armadillo specimens highlight value of museum collections for tracking pathogens

Museum archives hold biological specimens that have been collected over years or even decades. Modern molecular analysis of these collections can reveal information about pathogens and their spread.
Nematode larvae belonging to the genus Anisakis can cause the disease anisakiasis, a threat to human health. Shutterstock / WH_Pics

How to be sushi smart: tips on avoiding anisakis disease

Raw seafood dishes such as sushi, poke bowls and ceviche are increasingly popular, but can harbour fish-borne parasites. What’s the best way to protect ourselves?
Countries around the world were not prepared to respond to COVID-19. Andrew Wasike Shimanyula/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

Predicting epidemics isn’t easy. We’ve created a global dataset to help

A new global dataset shows there is no clear global increase of infectious disease outbreaks over time. And it can suggest which countries would most likely be affected by an outbreak.
Bird flu is transmitted mainly by wild birds, like these snow geese in Ruthsberg, Md., in January 2023. Photo by JIM WATSON/AFP via Getty Images

As bird flu continues to spread in the US and worldwide, what’s the risk that it could start a human pandemic? 4 questions answered

Avian influenza viruses have evolved to infect birds, but the current H5N1 outbreak is also infecting a wide range of mammals. This suggests that it could mutate into forms that threaten humans.
Sindhi cattle near Amazon rainforest: flexitarian diets could feed the growing world population without further encroaching onto wild habitat. Lucas Ninno via GettyImages

Eating less food from animal sources is key to reducing the risk of wildlife-origin diseases and global warming

Infectious diseases originating in wild animals are high and may be increasing. This is a sign that ecosystem degradation is undermining the planet’s capacity to sustain human wellbeing.

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