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Articles sur Indigenous knowledge

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Archaeologists and marine scientists must work together with Indigenous communities and policy makers to protect Australia’s cultural heritage above and below the sea. Sam Wright

Australia’s coastal waters are rich in Indigenous cultural heritage, but it remains hidden and under threat

With 300 stone artefacts submerged on Australia’s continental shelf last year, Indigenous underwater cultural heritage needs to be prioritised in marine science and industry practices.
Warlpiri person showing a honey ant after hunting. shutterstock

For too long, research was done on First Nations peoples, not with them. Universities can change this

Historically, research has been imposed upon Indigenous people, instead of conducted with them. This is an exploration of more collaborative ways to research when working with Indigenous communities.
Castor oil plant is popular in rural South Africa for its medicinal qualities. Creative Touch Imaging Ltd./NurPhoto via Getty Images

South Africa is rich in plants used for skincare: rural women helped us document some

Traditional herbal medicines and cosmetics remain popular in South Africa especially in rural areas where they are part of people’s culture.
An Aboriginal hunting ground is acknowledged in Cadigal Green, University of Sydney, by landscape architects Taylor Cullity Lethlean with Paul Thompson and Paul Carter, 2009. Michael Nicholson

Australia’s universities are on unceded land. Here’s how they must reconcile with First Nations people

Universities must meaningfully acknowledge they are sited on unceded First Nations land and Indigenous culture should be recognised in campus design. These steps are vital for reconciliation.
Clayoquot Sound, part of the Tla-o-qui-aht territory, has been the site of numerous protests against logging the forest. Meares Island was declared a Tribal Park in 1984. (Shutterstock)

Respect for Indigenous knowledge must lead nature conservation efforts in Canada

To combat the biodiversity crisis, we need to fundamentally shift our economy and society and make nature conservation the norm.
The main chamber of Cloggs Cave. Monash University archaeologist Joe Crouch is standing in the 1970s excavation pit, digging a new area in the wall of the old excavation. Bruno David

Magic, culture and stalactites: how Aboriginal perspectives are transforming archaeological histories

Two starkly different research projects at East Gippsland’s Cloggs Cave, 50 years apart, show the importance of Indigenous perspectives in archaeology.
A variety of clues can tip off archaeologists about a promising spot for excavation. Gabriel Wrobel

How do archaeologists know where to dig?

Archaeologists used to dig primarily at sites that were easy to find thanks to obvious visual clues. But technology – and listening to local people – plays a much bigger role now.
Land managers have embraced firestick burning as a highly effective tool — just one example of the value of Indigenous knowledge. AAP/AP

How a university can embed Indigenous knowledge into the curriculum and why it matters

Australian universities have committed to a process of Indigenisation. The University of Tasmania provides a case study in how to incorporate Indigenous knowledge into academic programs.

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