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Articles sur Urban wildlife

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Anton Darius/Unsplash

One cat, one year, 110 native animals: lock up your pet, it’s a killing machine

Roaming pet cats kill 390 million animals per year in Australia. Most of the animals are native to Australia.
AP News

Where the wild things are: how nature might respond as coronavirus keeps humans indoors

Wildlife is returning to our deserted cities. But will they stay once life returns to normal?
Dean Ingwersen/Birdlife Australia/AAP

Want to help save wildlife after the fires? You can do it in your own backyard

Some threatened species hit hard by the bushfires this summer have populations in and around urban areas, which are now crucial refuges. Here are some tips to help improve their odds of survival.
These birds were killed by flying into a set of surveyed buildings in Washington DC in 2013. USGS Bee Inventory and Monitoring Lab/Flickr

Buildings kill millions of birds. Here’s how to reduce the toll

The tall buildings of our cities kill horrifying numbers of birds. But some cities are adopting mandatory design measures to cut the toll.
Our mental health benefits when nature is part of our neighbourhoods, as in this residential street in Fitzroy, Melbourne. Melanie Thomson

Biodiversity and our brains: how ecology and mental health go together in our cities

It’s well-established that green spaces are good for our well-being. Now we can demonstrate that greater biodiversity boosts this benefit, as well as helping to sustain native plants and animals.
A coyote in Vancouver, B.C. Rodent pesticides in large cities kill and adversely affect the health of urban wildlife. (Shutterstock)

Toxic cities: Urban wildlife affected by exposure to pollutants

Urban wildlife are exposed to more pollutants than wildlife living in natural areas. In addition to causing death, these pollutants can affect animals’ development and reproduction.
Learning about urban rat populations through genetic testing reveals information about their movements through cities. Shutterstock

Rat detective uses DNA to uncover how rats scurry around cities

Genetic analysis shows that urban rats prefer to stay near their relatives; however, some of them migrate. Knowing this could help with pest control efforts.
Rats are part of the urban ecosystem and an urban ecology approach to managing their populations may involve learning to share the city. Mert Guller/Unsplash

Living with rats involves understanding the city as an ecosystem

An ecosystems approach to cities that recognizes rats as part of the ecosystem can help address the challenges presented by urban rats.

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