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Articles on Alzheimer's disease

Displaying 41 - 60 of 227 articles

In most cases, scientists are still unsure of what causes Alzheimer’s disease. FGC / Shutterstock.com

No cure for Alzheimer’s disease in my lifetime

After the failure of multiple drug trials the outlook for an Alzheimer's drug is bleak. This shouldn't be a surprise. We don't know the cause or even how to diagnose the disease.
An MRI image of the brain. SpeedKingz/Shutterstock.com

An unexpected pathway to treating neurodegenerative diseases

Not all drug development needs to start from scratch. Sometimes researchers discover that a drug developed for one disease can be used for another. Here a cancer drug may show promise for dementia.
Figuring out the pieces to the Alzheimer’s puzzle. Naeblys/Shutterstock.com

Time for a Manhattan Project on Alzheimer’s

Many pieces leading to Alzheimer's disease have been identified. To put the pieces together, one scholar argues that the government should launch a Manhattan Project-scale effort to find a cure.
If you engage in cognitively stimulating activities in midlife, such as reading and playing games, you can reduce dementia risk by about 26 per cent, according to research. (Unsplash/Rawpixel)

How to reduce your risks of dementia

Research is revealing many ways in which we can reduce our dementia risks -- from eating a Mediterranean diet and exercising, to playing games and studying for degrees.
Long-term exposure to air pollution was linked to cognitive decline in elderly people. Tao55/ Shutterstock

Air pollution may be making us less intelligent

Air pollution is bad for our heart and lung health – and a new study says it may be bad for brain health, too.
Dementia patients are often the perpetrators and often the victims of abuse. Research also shows that a medical history of head injury can more than double the risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease in some populations, even after many years. (Shutterstock)

Dementia’s hidden darkness: Violence and domestic abuse

From aggressive patients with Alzheimer's to frustrated caregivers, dementia is increasingly entwined with violence in private homes and residential facilities.

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