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Artículos sobre 14th Amendment

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Club Q co-owners Nic Grzecka, left, and Matthew Haynes listen during a police news conference on Nov. 21, 2022, in Colorado Springs, Colo. Scott Olson/Getty Images

Suspect in the Colorado LGBTQ shootings faces hate crimes charges – what exactly are they?

Bias-motivated attacks became a distinct crime in the 1980s. But police investigate only a fraction of the roughly 200,000 hate crimes reported each year – and even fewer ever make it to court.
Couy Griffin, a former county commissioner in Otero County, N.M., rides a horse in New York City in May 2020. Gotham/Getty Images

A New Mexico official who joined the Capitol attacks is barred from politics – but the little-known law behind the removal has some potential pitfalls for democracy

Other countries disqualify political officials and prevent them from holding office more often than the US does. There are benefits and potential risks to using this kind of legal tactic.
The Supreme Court hears a case on Dec. 1, 2021, regarding a Mississippi abortion law that poses a legal challenge to Roe v. Wade. (Photo by Stefani Reynolds/Getty Images

Supreme Court could redefine when a fetus becomes a person, upholding abortion limits while preserving the privacy right under Roe v. Wade

The upcoming debate at the Supreme Court is less about the existence of the right to abortion and more about how that right is limited by the emerging personhood of a fetus.
Republican politicians have championed legislation to limit the teaching of material exploring how race and racism influence American politics, culture and law. AP Photo/Mary Altaffer, File

Lawsuits over bans on teaching critical race theory are coming – here’s what won’t work, and what might

New state laws in the US banning teaching about systemic racism raise the question: Does the Constitution protect public school teachers’ right to choose how and what to teach?
Legislation pending in Congress would contribute to reforming how police conduct themselves – but there’s a limit to what federal legislation can do. Seth Herald / AFP/Getty Images

Congress can’t do much about fixing local police – but it can tie strings to federal grants

While many in America are looking to Congress to pass police reform legislation, the federal government has almost no control over state and local police departments.
People gather outside the U.S. Supreme Court building as news spread of Associate Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s Sept. 18 death. AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite

3 ways a 6-3 Supreme Court would be different

A 6-3 conservative court will hear a broader range of controversial cases, shift interpretations of individual rights and put more pressure on local democracy to make policy decisions.
Michael Widomski, left, and David Hagedorn at the makeshift memorial for Justice Ginsburg in front of the U.S. Supreme Court on Sept. 20, 2020 in Washington, DC. Ginsburg officiated their wedding in 2013. Samuel Corum/Getty Images

Ginsburg’s legal victories for women led to landmark anti-discrimination rulings for the LGBTQ community, too

Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s death sparked many tributes to her work ending sex discrimination against women. That work also paved the way for successes in the fight for equal rights for the LGBTQ community.
Some people are U.S. citizens at birth, like this baby born in California. Joseph Sohm/Shutterstock.com

Who is born a US citizen?

If upheld, a federal court ruling would solidify birthright citizenship as the law of the land, and overturn more than a century of federal refusal to grant American Samoans citizenship status.
The Constitution is interpreted differently by the alt-right. Shutterstock/Joseph Sohm

How the alt-right corrupts the Constitution

The growing number of self-taught, right-wing experts on the Constitution believe not only in the rights of white people, but have a comprehensive – if not comprehensible – view of the Constitution.

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