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Artículos sobre Neuroscience

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The National Institutes of Health estimates the existence of 7,000 rare diseases, with some affecting only a handful of people. Alan Phillips/E! via Getty Images

When it comes to the rarest of diseases, the diagnosis isn’t the answer – it’s just the starting point

Deciphering the biological pathways behind rare genetic diseases often involves assembling a team of specialists to work closely with the family members of those affected.
New research indicates that rhesus monkeys show interoception – the ability to sense physiological processes like their own heartbeats. Matthew Verdolivo/UC Davis IET Academic Technology Services

Monkeys can sense their own heartbeats, an ability tied to mental health, consciousness and memory in humans

Researchers used a test designed for babies to show that rhesus monkeys can sense their own heartbeats. The finding opens up important paths of research into consciousness and mental health issues.
The human brain isn’t built to understand large numbers. OsakaWayne Studios/Moment via Getty Images

Brains are bad at big numbers, making it impossible to grasp what a million COVID-19 deaths really means

The brain can count small numbers or compare large ones. But it struggles to understand the value of a single large number. This fact may be influencing how people react to numbers about the pandemic.
The brain responds differently to natural touch on a finger versus a direct electrical stimulation. Sebastian Kaulitzki/Science Photo Library

Restoring touch through electrodes implanted in the human brain will require engineering around a sensory lag

When designing neuroprosthetic devices for users to control with their thoughts, engineers must take into account the sensory information brains collect from the environment and how it gets processed.
Psychedelics have been the subject of a recent surge of interest in their potential therapeutic effects. metamorworks/iStock via Getty Images

AI maps psychedelic ‘trip’ experiences to regions of the brain – opening new route to psychiatric treatments

Pinpointing the molecular targets behind the subjective effects of psychedelic drugs could help clinicians and researchers better treat psychiatric conditions.
A new brain-imaging study finds that participants who had even mild COVID-19 showed an average reduction in whole brain sizes. Kirstypargeter/iStock via Getty Images Plus

Even mild cases of COVID-19 can leave a mark on the brain, such as reductions in gray matter – a neuroscientist explains emerging research

New research offers insights into the brain after COVID-19 that may have implications for our understanding of long COVID-19 and how the disease affects our senses of taste and smell.

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