Menu Fermer

Articles sur Immunology

Affichage de 1 à 20 de 45 articles

Is COVID-19 hitting men harder than women? UpperCut Images/Getty Images

Why males may have a worse response to COVID-19

A new study is the first to identify sex differences in inflammation and immune cell activation in response to SARS-CoV-2 infection, which causes COVID-19.
A worker inspects vials of a SARS CoV-2 vaccine for COVID-19 produced by SinoVac at its factory in Beijing on Sept. 24, 2020. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)

Training our immune systems: Why we should insist on a high-quality COVID-19 vaccine

Our first exposure to a pathogen, either naturally or via vaccination, can affect how our immune system responds in the future to the same or similar pathogens.
This antibody adopts a Y-shape. The arms of the Y make up the part of the antibody that binds to the target. ALFRED PASIEKA/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY

One small part of a human antibody has the potential to work as a drug for both prevention and therapy of COVID-19

Antibodies are great for neutralizing viruses. But they are big and bulky. Antibody engineers are now creating smaller synthetic antibody-like molecules that may be better for fighting COVID-19.
Vaccinologists have not focused their research on tailoring vaccines to induce robust immune responses in the elderly. (Shutterstock)

Why vaccines are less effective in the elderly, and what it means for COVID-19

Immunosenescence — the decline of immune system function with age — means that vaccines are not as effective in older adults, the demographic most susceptible to many diseases, including COVID-19.

Les contributeurs les plus fréquents

Plus