Menu Fermer

Articles sur Vaccine safety

Affichage de 1 à 20 de 42 articles

Talking about vaccines with trusted health care providers and with family can help wade through the sea of information – and misinformation. Morsa Images/DigitalVison via Getty Images

Misinformation will be rampant when it comes to COVID-19 shots for young children – here’s what you can do to counter it

With COVID-19 shots finally available for infants and preschoolers, knowing how to combat misinformation on social media and elsewhere could be more important than ever.
With the holiday season approaching, people wait to receive a COVID-19 vaccination in Montréal as the pandemic continues in Canada and around the world. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Graham Hughes

Answers from COVID experts: How do you talk to family members who aren’t vaccinated? How can the vaccines be safe if they were developed so quickly? Is natural immunity better than being vaccinated?

A panel of experts answer questions about vaccines, omicron and other COVID-related issues in a discussion with The Conversation.
Health care providers are just one trusted source of information for parents on the safety of COVID-19 vaccines for children. Cavan Images/Cavan via Getty Images

COVID-19 vaccines for children: How parents are influenced by misinformation, and how they can counter it

Pediatricians and other health care providers can take some concrete steps toward building trust and counteracting anti-vaccination misinformation.
Vaccine hesitancy has been a growing challenge for more than a decade. Concerns about vaccine safety and adverse events are the most commonly cited reasons. (AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis) 

How cognitive biases and adverse events influence vaccine decisions (maybe even your own)

To help increase trust in vaccines, researchers analyzed data on adverse events to address safety concerns, and then used cognitive science to show how cognitive biases feed vaccine hesitancy.
A sign shows the way to a recovery area to monitor any immediate side effects from the COVID-19 vaccine on Dec. 17, 2020, in Reno, Nevada. Patrick T. Fallon /AFP via Getty Images

What COVID-19 vaccine side effects might I expect?

Many people never experience the least bit of discomfort from the COVID-19 vaccines, but mild side effects are common. They include swelling in the affected arm, nausea and chills.
An unidentified doctor talks with a boy who holds a lollipop reward after participating in a measles vaccine research program in Upper Darby, Pennsylvania, in 1963. NASA/PhotoQuest/Getty Images

What’s in a name for a vaccine campaign? Maybe the end of the pandemic

Vaccination has been controversial from its beginning. Gaining people’s trust in vaccines has been crucial. An important part of that is a strong communications plan.

Les contributeurs les plus fréquents

Plus