Australian Bureau of Meteorology

The Bureau of Meteorology is Australia’s national weather, climate and water agency. Its expertise and services assist Australians in dealing with the harsh realities of their natural environment, including drought, floods, fires, storms, tsunami and tropical cyclones. Through regular forecasts, warnings, monitoring and advice spanning the Australian region and Antarctic territory, the Bureau provides one of the most fundamental and widely used services of government.

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Australia will probably see fewer tropical cyclones reaching land this season. AAP Image/Bureau of Meteorology

Australia could see fewer cyclones, but more heat and fire risk in coming months

Southern and eastern Australia need to prepare for heatwaves and increased fire risk this summer, as forecasts predict hot, dry weather.
Antarctic winds have a huge effect on weather in other places. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center/Flickr

The air above Antarctica is suddenly getting warmer – here’s what it means for Australia

Each spring, winds circling the South Pole weaken. If they weaken enough, they can actually reverse – causing rapid warming.
Snow fell during the AFL match between the GWS Giants and the Hawthorn Hawks at the UNSW Canberra Oval. AAP Image/Lukas Coch

Snow at the footy? Just how unusual was last weekend’s weather?

Cold fronts swept south-eastern Australia, bringing snow and freezing temperatures. While snow is expected to decrease with climate change, cold snaps are likely to keep coming.
Cyclones Trevor and Veronica hit north Australia in 2019. NASA Earth Observatory handout/EPA/AAP

I’ve always wondered: how do cyclones get their names?

In 1887 Queensland’s chief weatherman Clement Wragge began naming tropical cyclones, using names from the Greek alphabet, fabulous beasts and politicians who annoyed him.
The Cape Grim observatory, home of the ‘world’s cleanest air’… and rising greenhouse gases. CSIRO

Why there’s more greenhouse gas in the atmosphere than you may have realised

Carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere are at 414 parts per million. But thanks to a recalculation of methane's warming power, the total amount of greenhouse gases is now equivalent to more than 500.
The sea is blue because of the way water absorbs light, the way particles in the water scatter light, and also because some of the blue light from the sky is reflected. Flickr/Fiona Paton

Curious Kids: is water blue or is it just reflecting off the sky?

Photons stream from the sun and interact with all matter on Earth. Depending on what the light touches, some of the photons will get absorbed or soaked up. And some will bounce back.
Sea ice responds to changes in winds and ocean currents, sometimes with origins thousands of kilometres away. NASA/Nathan Kurtz

Why Antarctica’s sea ice cover is so low (and no, it’s not just about climate change)

Antarctic sea ice cover fell to an all-time low recently and hasn't yet recovered. Why? The initial answers could lie in an unlikely place – the tropics.
Salida de la Tierra: los astronautas del Apolo 8 capturaron esta espectacular foto de la Tierra elevándose por encima del horizonte lunar mientras emergían desde detrás del lado oscuro de la Luna. NASA

Salida de la Tierra: la foto que cambió el mundo cumple medio siglo

Hace cincuenta años la gente vio nuestro planeta desde el exterior por primera vez.
Earthrise: astronauts aboard Apollo 8 captured this spectacular photo of Earth rising above the lunar horizon as they emerged from behind the dark side of the Moon. Image Credit: NASA

Earthrise, a photo that changed the world

Fifty years ago people saw our planet from the outside for the first time.
Meteorologists use their own experience, which helps them to decide whether the computer’s prediction is likely to be right. AAP Image/Chris Pavlich

Curious Kids: how do people know what the weather will be?

Twice every day the Bureau of Meteorology sends out the official weather forecasts for towns and cities across Australia. Here's how we work out what to say in them.
Storm clouds move over the Illawarra south of Sydney on Wednesday, November 28 2018. Sydney received more than a month’s worth of rain in just two hours, with Observatory Hill recording 84.6mm by 7am. The November average is 83.8mm. Dean Lewins/AAP

Sydney storms could be making the Queensland fires worse

Bushfires across Queensland are fanned by high winds pushed north by a strong low in NSW.
Maximum temperatures for January to September were the warmest on record for the Murray–Darling Basin and New South Wales. DEAN LEWINS/AAP

Australia moves to El Niño alert and the drought is likely to continue

After the warmest month on record, it looks like Australia will have an El Niño event – which means the drought is likely to continue.
The Bureau of Meteorology’s tropical cyclone outlook is out today. AAP Image/Bureau of Meteorology, Japan Meteorological Agency

Trust Me, I’m An Expert: Cyclone season approacheth, but this year there’s a twist

Cyclone season approacheth, but this year there’s a twist. The Conversation, CC BY31.4 MB (download)
Australia must come to terms with some fundamental shifts in our weather patterns. This month, Andrew Watkins from the BOM and climate scientist Joelle Gergis explore what's in store.

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