Australian Bureau of Meteorology

The Bureau of Meteorology is Australia’s national weather, climate and water agency. Its expertise and services assist Australians in dealing with the harsh realities of their natural environment, including drought, floods, fires, storms, tsunami and tropical cyclones. Through regular forecasts, warnings, monitoring and advice spanning the Australian region and Antarctic territory, the Bureau provides one of the most fundamental and widely used services of government.

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Maximum temperatures for January to September were the warmest on record for the Murray–Darling Basin and New South Wales. DEAN LEWINS/AAP

Australia moves to El Niño alert and the drought is likely to continue

After the warmest month on record, it looks like Australia will have an El Niño event – which means the drought is likely to continue.
The Bureau of Meteorology’s tropical cyclone outlook is out today. AAP Image/Bureau of Meteorology, Japan Meteorological Agency

Trust Me, I’m An Expert: Cyclone season approacheth, but this year there’s a twist

Cyclone season approacheth, but this year there’s a twist. The Conversation, CC BY31.4 MB (download)
Australia must come to terms with some fundamental shifts in our weather patterns. This month, Andrew Watkins from the BOM and climate scientist Joelle Gergis explore what's in store.
Sometimes air goes up past the condensation level then falls back below the condensation level, then up, then below, again and again. This creates clouds that are stripy, often with lines between the clouds. Robert Lawry/Author provided

Curious Kids: where do clouds come from and why do they have different shapes?

Clouds formed by rising warm air currents are called 'convection clouds'. Because of all the rising air coming up, these clouds can be bumpy on top, sometimes looking like cotton wool or cauliflower.
The air doesn’t like to be under pressure just like us. The wind is the result of the air trying to escape from high pressure. Mami Kempe / The Conversation

Curious Kids: What causes windy weather?

Wind is just air moving from one place where there is high pressure to another place where there is low pressure.
Only clouds that are tall with big water drops can make rain, but they also stop most of the light, which makes them look grey. Marcella Cheng/The Conversation

Curious Kids: why does rain only come from grey clouds?

To answer this question from Fiona, age 6, we need to know some things about clouds and light.
The storm intensified rapidly off the US east coast. NOAA/EPA

Explainer: ‘bomb cyclones’ – the intense winter storms that hit the US (and Australia too)

The US was hit by a 'bomb cyclone' last week, bringing icy cold and driving snow. These storms develop very rapidly, forming outside the tropics, typically on continental east coasts in winter.
Australia veered from very wet to very dry in a year of wide-ranging weather extremes. AAP Image/Mal Fairclough

Australia’s climate in 2017: a warm year, with a wet start and finish

Last year saw plenty of warm weather around the country, but other notable events included dry months in the southeast, some very cold winter nights, and record-warm dry season days in the north.
Frost affected many crops across WA during September 2016. WA Department of Primary Industry and Regional Development

Not just heat: even our spring frosts can bear the fingerprint of climate change

We already know that climate change makes heatwaves hotter and longer. But a new series of research papers asks whether there is also a climate fingerprint on frosty spells and bouts of wet weather.
Knowing about hailstones in advance would be preferable. AAP Image/Dan Peled

All hail new weather radar technology, which can spot hailstones lurking in thunderstorms

New "dual-pol" weather radars promise to spot large hailstones forming inside thunderstorms, giving people a heads-up when it's about to hail.
Climate change is already delivering more extremes of wet and dry to the Pacific region. EPA/FRANCIS R. MALASIG

Droughts and flooding rains already more likely as climate change plays havoc with Pacific weather

New research shows that global warming has already begun to exacerbate extremes of rainfall in the Pacific region – with more to come.

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