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Australian Bureau of Meteorology

The Bureau of Meteorology is Australia’s national weather, climate and water agency. Its expertise and services assist Australians in dealing with the harsh realities of their natural environment, including drought, floods, fires, storms, tsunami and tropical cyclones. Through regular forecasts, warnings, monitoring and advice spanning the Australian region and Antarctic territory, the Bureau provides one of the most fundamental and widely used services of government.

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Laut berwarna biru karena cara air menyerap cahaya, partikel-partikel dalam air menyebarkan cahaya, dan juga karena sebagian cahaya biru dari langit dipantulkan. Flickr/Fiona Paton

Curious Kids: biru itu warna asli air atau hanya pantulan dari langit?

Foton mengalir dari matahari dan berinteraksi dengan semua materi di Bumi. Tergantung cahaya jatuh dimana, beberapa foton akan diserap dan beberapa akan terpantul.
It’s the first time since overlapping records began that Australia experienced both its lowest rainfall and highest temperatures in the same year. dan HIMBRECHTS/AAP

Weather bureau says hottest, driest year on record led to extreme bushfire season

The Bureau of Meterology says persistent drought and record temperatures were a major driver of Australia's fire activity, and the context for 2019 lies in the past three years of drought.
Last year fire storms raged across California. Similar conditions could become more likely for Australia. Giovanni is interested in how meteorological processes operate at multiple spatial and temporal scales to control air pollution events, and how this influence is mediated by topographic variation and characteristics of the urban environment. His current r

Climate change will make fire storms more likely in southeastern Australia

Extreme fire risk will overlap with weather patterns to create fire tornadoes more often under climate change.
Australia will probably see fewer tropical cyclones reaching land this season. AAP Image/Bureau of Meteorology

Australia could see fewer cyclones, but more heat and fire risk in coming months

Southern and eastern Australia need to prepare for heatwaves and increased fire risk this summer, as forecasts predict hot, dry weather.
Antarctic winds have a huge effect on weather in other places. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center/Flickr

The air above Antarctica is suddenly getting warmer – here’s what it means for Australia

Each spring, winds circling the South Pole weaken. If they weaken enough, they can actually reverse – causing rapid warming.
Snow fell during the AFL match between the GWS Giants and the Hawthorn Hawks at the UNSW Canberra Oval. AAP Image/Lukas Coch

Snow at the footy? Just how unusual was last weekend’s weather?

Cold fronts swept south-eastern Australia, bringing snow and freezing temperatures. While snow is expected to decrease with climate change, cold snaps are likely to keep coming.
Cyclones Trevor and Veronica hit north Australia in 2019. NASA Earth Observatory handout/EPA/AAP

I’ve always wondered: how do cyclones get their names?

In 1887 Queensland’s chief weatherman Clement Wragge began naming tropical cyclones, using names from the Greek alphabet, fabulous beasts and politicians who annoyed him.
The Cape Grim observatory, home of the ‘world’s cleanest air’… and rising greenhouse gases. CSIRO

Why there’s more greenhouse gas in the atmosphere than you may have realised

Carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere are at 414 parts per million. But thanks to a recalculation of methane's warming power, the total amount of greenhouse gases is now equivalent to more than 500.
The sea is blue because of the way water absorbs light, the way particles in the water scatter light, and also because some of the blue light from the sky is reflected. Flickr/Fiona Paton

Curious Kids: is water blue or is it just reflecting off the sky?

Photons stream from the sun and interact with all matter on Earth. Depending on what the light touches, some of the photons will get absorbed or soaked up. And some will bounce back.
Sea ice responds to changes in winds and ocean currents, sometimes with origins thousands of kilometres away. NASA/Nathan Kurtz

Why Antarctica’s sea ice cover is so low (and no, it’s not just about climate change)

Antarctic sea ice cover fell to an all-time low recently and hasn't yet recovered. Why? The initial answers could lie in an unlikely place – the tropics.

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