Menu Close

Articles on Resilience

Displaying 1 - 20 of 163 articles

A protestor holds a sign saying ‘Reparation for Reconciliation’ as Pope Francis arrives for a public event in Iqaluit, Nunavut on July 29, 2022, during his papal visit across Canada. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette

Reparations to Indigenous Peoples are critical after Pope’s apology for residential schools

The Pope’s apology could mark a new way forward if the Catholic Church makes genuine reparations for the evils it perpetrated.
Epilepsy is characterized by spontaneous and recurrent seizures, often triggered by stress or visual stimuli. (Shutterstock)

What epilepsy teaches us about diversity and resilience

Our team studied the activity of neurons in people with epilepsy. Neurons in the brain regions responsible for triggering seizures were much less diverse.
Entrepreneurs face many obstacles that threaten their survival, including financial insecurity and market uncertainties. (Shutterstock)

5 ways entrepreneurs can become more psychologically resilient

By investing in learning, believing in your capabilities and vision, harnessing failure as fuel for growth and leaning on social support, anyone can become a psychologically resilient entrepreneur.
Transgender people of color face more than their share of discrimination and violence. We Are/DigitalVision via Getty Images

Transgender people of color face unique challenges as gender discrimination and racism intersect

Being both trans and a person of color comes with a unique set of challenges. Collectively working toward overcoming these barriers is one way this community fights for survival.
The psychosocial impact of the pandemic and responses to it have been immense, but the Canadian government’s approach to COVID-19 remains divisive. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Justin Tang

Restoring community dialogue and resilience: The next COVID-19 emergency

Canada’s ‘us against them’ COVID-19 strategy is amplifying social division, creating major psychosocial impacts, and has resulted in a significant decrease in trust toward authorities.
Cities that have vibrant cultural and public services tend to withstand mass plant closures and layoffs better than communities lacking them, and young people either move to them after plant closures or remain living in them. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Paul Chiasson

Public and cultural services may play critical roles in a city’s resilience

Preliminary research suggests cultural and social services retain or attract employees hard hit by plant closures in other communities. Preserving them may help cities withstand future crises.
Ontario Premier Doug Ford gives a press conference at Queen’s Park regarding the easing of COVID-19 restrictions on Thursday, Jan. 20, 2022. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette

The death of caremongering: Canadians are tired and most believe getting COVID-19 is inevitable

After Premier Doug Ford announced “positive news,” I think about the widening inequality in our province, who the news is “positive” for and the death of caremongering.
A Syrian-Canadian family poses outside their home in Peterborough, Ont., in December 2021. They were among thousands of Syrian refugees resettled in Canada by April 2017 under a program introduced by the Liberal government in 2015 — and now thousands of Afghan refugees are arriving in Canada, many of them under the age of 18. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Fred Thornhill

How Canada should be preparing to help young Afghan refugees

As Canada welcomes refugees from Afghanistan, we must take a moment to learn from the past. Communities across Canada need to be asking how they can be supporting young refugees in their integration.
If hope feels far-fetched this winter, you’re not alone. picture alliance via Getty Images

Tackling 2022 with hope: 5 essential reads

Five articles on the meanings of hope and how to think about resilience, healing and even joy in the midst of this winter’s bleakness.
Research shows that people who have flow as a regular part of their lives are happier and less likely to focus on themselves. Yulkapopkova/E+ via Getty Images

Why does experiencing ‘flow’ feel so good? A communication scientist explains

Research shows that people with more flow in their lives had a higher sense of well-being during the COVID-19 pandemic. Scientists are beginning to explore what happens in the brain during flow.

Top contributors

More