Articles on Alzheimer's disease

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There are many processes that occur as a result of ‘wear and tear’ in the body. from www.shutterstock.com.au

What’s happening in our bodies as we age?

Cells and processes in our body have existed for longer and longer periods of time.
Many reasons that weren’t explored may account for the findings that women who drank coffee decreased their risk of dementia. Tim Wright/Unsplash

Research Check: can drinking coffee reduce your dementia risk?

A study was reported to show caffeine protects older women from dementia. But looking closer at the research, we can't truly claim coffee was the reason some of the women had a lower risk of dementia.
Providing a sample for a genetic test might not actually give you the health answers you’re looking for. Canadian Blood Services/flickr

Genetic testing isn’t a crystal ball for your health

Testing some genes for Alzheimer's disease, coeliac disease and folate conversion does not lead to improved health outcomes, and may create anxiety or false hope amongst patients.
Happy-looking seniors via Shutterstock. From www.shutterstock.com

Why dementia burden may be less than feared

Improvements in education and vascular health are likely partly responsible for a sharp decline in dementia over the past few decades. The trend may continue, if we also address obesity and diabetes.
Hearing the same questions over and over again can be frustrating, but it’s important you stay calm – they’re not trying to annoy you. from www.shutterstock.com.au

Answering the same questions over and over: how to talk to people with dementia

If you care for or know someone with dementia, they've probably asked you “what are we doing today?” “who are you?” or “when are we going home?”
A blood test for dementia would be great, but there are limitations as to what blood can tell us about our brains. from www.shutterstock.com.au

How far off is a blood test for Alzheimer’s disease?

Blood has some disadvantages for diagnosis as it is separated from the brain by what is called the "blood brain barrier". This makes it difficult to establish that a signal is actually coming from the brain.
President Obama awards a Presidential Medal of Freedom to Pat Summitt in 2012. Summit died June 28 from early-onset Alzheimer’s. Kevin Lamarque/Reuters

Early-onset Alzheimer’s: should you worry?

Alzheimer's disease is one of the most feared illnesses of people 60 and up. A rare type of Alzheimer's, called early-onset, can occur in people even younger. How can you tell if you are at risk?
Dementia can affect the ability to perform tasks such as dressing, showering and eating. from shutterstock.com

How Australians Die: cause #3 – dementia (Alzheimer’s)

Dementia is the third leading cause of death in Australia. As the population ages, the number of people with dementia is expected to rise, as is the number of deaths from dementia.

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