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Articles on Anti-malarial treatments

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An employee in Nantong, China, checks the production of chloroquine phosphate, an old drug for the treatment of malaria. Feature China/Barcroft Media via Getty Images

Could chloroquine treat coronavirus? 5 questions answered about a promising, problematic and unproven use for an antimalarial drug

A medicinal chemist addresses questions about chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine: what it is, whether it is effective against COVID-19 and whether it can treat and/or prevent this disease.
Even without drugs, nets or an understanding of what caused malaria, human bodies were still fighting against the parasite – and winning. from shutterstock.com

How our red blood cells keep evolving to fight malaria

Today, human populations carry heavy genetic marks from the war with malaria. And it is the red blood cell (erythrocyte) that mostly bears the scars.
Fake medicines are a lucrative global business. When it comes to malaria drugs that don’t work, they can be deadly. AP Photo/Martin Mejia

Fake drugs are one reason malaria still kills so many

Each year, 500,000 people die of malaria annually, a preventable disease. Most of them children in Africa, where many anti-malarial drugs are fake or substandard.
Leave your medicines in their box when you go abroad, and check if you need a doctor’s letter. from www.shutterstock.com

The medicines to pack for your overseas holiday

Before travelling, plan ahead in case you need to pack medicines for sleep, diarrhoea, malaria, pain or anxiety.
A young girl with malaria rests in the inpatient ward of a health centre in the South Sudan. Reuters/Adriane Ohanesian

What Africa still needs to do to eliminate malaria

Eliminating malaria in Africa has been held back by a range of factors, including a lack of funds and drug and insecticide resistance challenges.

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