Articles on Brazil election 2018

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Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro walks past the Granaderos presidential guard during a recent welcoming ceremony in Santiago, Chile. (AP Photo/Esteban Felix)

The new Brazilian government is devoid of ideas

The popularity of Brazil's new president has decreased significantly in just a few months. Why? Too much controversy and too few ideas.
Days before their Oct. 28 presidential election, Brazilians protested news that supporters of right-wing front-runner Jair Bolsonaro had used WhatsApp to spread false information about his opponents. Reuters/Nacho Doce

WhatsApp skewed Brazilian election, proving social media’s danger to democracy

Facebook retired its 'Move fast and break things' slogan – perhaps because, as new research from Brazil confirms, democracy is among the things left broken by online misinformation and fake news.
Ontario PC leadership candidate Tanya Granic Allen arrives to participate in a debate in Ottawa in February 2018. Granic Allen was supported by the Campaign Life Coalition (CLC), and the organization said it recruited more than 9,000 PC memberships in support of her campaign to became the premier of Ontario. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Justin Tang

From America to Ontario: The political impact of the Christian right

Christian right groups in Canada may not have the same resources as their American counterparts. They are, nonetheless, attracting supporters by borrowing some U.S. tactics.
Supporters of Brazilian president-elect Jair Bolsonaro hope he will ‘transform’ their country, which has been mired in political and economic crises since 2015. AP Photo/Leo Correa

What Bolsonaro’s presidency means for Brazil: 5 essential reads

Bolsonaro promised angry Brazilians he would transform their crisis-stricken country. But he didn't say how. Five Brazil experts examine his policies on crime, the economy, women, the Amazon and more.
Bolsonaro supporters celebrate outside his home in Rio de Janeiro after exit polls on Oct. 28 declared him the preliminary winner of Brazil’s 2018 presidential election. AP Photo/Leo Correa

Bolsonaro wins Brazil election, promises to purge leftists from country

Jair Bolsonaro, a right-wing congressman and former army captain, is Brazil's next president, with 56 percent of votes. Critics see a threat to democracy in his scathing attacks on Brazilian society.
Presidential runoff candidates: Jair Bolsonaro, far-right lawmaker of the Social Liberal Party and Fernando Haddad of Brazil’s leftist Workers Party. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes/Washington Alves

‘Disillusioned’ Brazilians choose Bolsonaro, Haddad after a tense and violent campaign

After four years of economic crisis and corruption, Brazilians have never trusted their government less. They showed their frustration Sunday, voting for two ideologically opposed candidates.
Black women in Brazil protest presidential frontrunner Jair Bolsonaro, who is known for his disparaging remarks about women, on Sept. 29, 2018. AP Photo/Silvia Izquierdo

Sexism, racism drive more black women to run for office in both Brazil and US

In Brazil, a record 1,237 black women will stand for office in Sunday's general election. As in the US, their campaigns reflect deep personal concern about rising racism and sexism in politics.
The divisive right-wing Brazilian presidential candidate Jair Bolsonaro, seen in here on a campaign poster, is often likened to Donald Trump. Some supporters take pride in the comparison. Reuters/Ricardo Moraes

Brazilian evangelicals, swinging hard to the right, could put a Trump-like populist in the presidency

Brazil's evangelical Christians are an increasingly powerful political force. These conservative, faith-based voters are now backing a divisive firebrand known for racist remarks for the presidency.
With over a dozen candidates and an incarcerated front-runner, Brazil’s 2018 presidential election has political analysts shrugging their shoulders. AP Photo/Leo Correa

Brazilian candidate still crushing his rivals from jail

Leftist former President Lula da Silva is the clear favorite in Brazil's 2018 presidential race, leading his closest rival — a firebrand conservative — by 15 points. The only problem: He's in jail.

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