Articles on Latin America

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Mexico’s President-elect Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador speaks about the upcoming changes his administration will impose on national security during the national peace and security plan conference in Mexico City on Nov. 14, 2018. (AP Photo/Anthony Vazquez)

Mexico’s left turn and the road to uncertainty

The success or failure of Mexico's new president will have an impact on politics in the rest of Latin America as right-wing forces reclaim power. Is a brighter future for the region possible?
Supporters of Brazilian president-elect Jair Bolsonaro hope he will ‘transform’ their country, which has been mired in political and economic crises since 2015. AP Photo/Leo Correa

What Bolsonaro’s presidency means for Brazil: 5 essential reads

Bolsonaro promised angry Brazilians he would transform their crisis-stricken country. But he didn't say how. Five Brazil experts examine his policies on crime, the economy, women, the Amazon and more.
Bolsonaro supporters celebrate outside his home in Rio de Janeiro after exit polls on Oct. 28 declared him the preliminary winner of Brazil’s 2018 presidential election. AP Photo/Leo Correa

Bolsonaro wins Brazil election, promises to purge leftists from country

Jair Bolsonaro, a right-wing congressman and former army captain, is Brazil's next president, with 56 percent of votes. Critics see a threat to democracy in his scathing attacks on Brazilian society.
Some 5,000 Venezuelans flee the country’s violence, tyranny and hunger every day, creating an historic migration crisis that rivals Syria’s. AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana

Trump sees opportunity in Venezuela’s humanitarian crisis as midterms approach

Trump has called Venezuela a 'human tragedy' and threatened invasion while quietly deporting and denying asylum to Venezuelan refugees. His anti-socialist rhetoric may make for good midterm politics.
Costa Ricans held a march in solidarity with Nicaraguan refugees on Aug. 25, 2018. An estimated 500,000 Nicaraguans live in Costa Rica, with more arriving daily as crisis in the country deepens. Reuters/Juan Carlos Ulate

Migrant money could be keeping Nicaragua’s uprising alive

Nicaraguan migrants send over US$1 billion home each year. This money has played a changing role in domestic politics – first boosting the Ortega regime and, now, sustaining the uprising against him.
Presidential runoff candidates: Jair Bolsonaro, far-right lawmaker of the Social Liberal Party and Fernando Haddad of Brazil’s leftist Workers Party. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes/Washington Alves

‘Disillusioned’ Brazilians choose Bolsonaro, Haddad after a tense and violent campaign

After four years of economic crisis and corruption, Brazilians have never trusted their government less. They showed their frustration Sunday, voting for two ideologically opposed candidates.
Mexican soldiers killed up to 300 student protesters and arrested 1,000 more on Oct. 3, 1968, in an event that’s come to be known as the Tlatelolco massacre. AP Photo

Massacres, disappearances and 1968: Mexicans remember the victims of a ‘perfect dictatorship’

Fifty years ago, soldiers gunned down hundreds of student protesters in a Mexico City plaza. It was neither the first nor the last time Mexico's army would be deployed against its own citizens.
Black women in Brazil protest presidential frontrunner Jair Bolsonaro, who is known for his disparaging remarks about women, on Sept. 29, 2018. AP Photo/Silvia Izquierdo

Sexism, racism drive more black women to run for office in both Brazil and US

In Brazil, a record 1,237 black women will stand for office in Sunday's general election. As in the US, their campaigns reflect deep personal concern about rising racism and sexism in politics.
Three years into a protracted political and economic crisis, Venezuela has seen TK million migrants — TK percent of its population — flee. Reuters/Luisa Gonzalez

Refugees from Venezuela are fleeing to Latin American cities, not refugee camps

Up to 5,000 refugees flee hunger and chaos in Venezuela each day – a migrant crisis rivaling Syria's. Most arrive to poor South American border cities that are dangerously unprepared for the influx.

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