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Articles on Colombia

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A marijuana trafficker practicing his aim in the Guajira, epicenter of Colombia’s first drug boom, in 1979. Romano Cagnoni/Getty Images

Marijuana fueled Colombian drug trade before cocaine was king

Step aside, Pablo Escobar. New research shows it was poor farmers who helped turn Colombia into the world's largest drug producer when they started growing and exporting pot in the 1970s.
Venezuelans try to enter Colombia at the closed Simon Bolivar international bridge borders crossing, March 16, 2020. Normally, 40,000 Venezuelans come into Colombia every day. Schneyder Mendoza/AFP via Getty Images)

Venezuelan migrants face crime, conflict and coronavirus at Colombia’s closed border

The coronavirus-related closure of the Colombian border hasn't stopped desperate Venezuelans from entering – but it has made the trip more dangerous.
More than 2,000 women were processed through demobilization camps in Colombia as the government transitions disarmed FARC guerrillas back into civilian life, Jan. 18, 2017. Kaveh Kazemi/Getty Images

A guerrilla-to-entrepreneur plan in Colombia leaves some new businesswomen isolated and at risk

Small business grants are supposed to help Colombia's disarmed FARC fighters start new lives as entrepreneurs. But interviews with 12 female ex-insurgents suggests the government plan may fail women.
Venezuelans hoping to cross into Ecuador via Colombia amass at the Rumichaca border bridge in Tulcan, Ecuador, as new visa restrictions limiting migration took effect, Aug. 26, 2019. Reuters/Daniel Tapia

Latin America shuts out desperate Venezuelans but Colombia’s border remains open – for now

Citing national security, Ecuador, Peru and Chile have all made it harder for Venezuelan migrants to enter the country, and xenophobia is rising across the region – even in more welcoming Colombia.
FARC commander Iván Márquez issued a return to armed struggle in a video posted Aug. 29, 2019. Reuters TV (screengrab)

Colombia’s peace process under stress: 6 essential reads

Dissidents in Colombia's FARC guerrillas are threatening to renew armed struggle three years after signing a landmark peace deal. Here, experts explain the history of Colombia's fragile peace process.
Red Cross forensic specialist Stephen Fonseca, right, searches for bodies in a field of ruined maize in Magaru, Mozambique, after Cyclone Idai, April 4, 2019. AP Photo/Tsvangirayi Mukwazhi

Humanitarian forensic scientists trace the missing, identify the dead and comfort the living

Meet the unsung aid workers who put their lives on the line during war and natural disaster to make sure the dead are treated with respect – and that their grieving families get closure.
Women dance during a protest march against the killing of activists, in Bogota, Colombia, on July 26, 2019. Colombians took to the streets to call for an end to a wave of killings in the wake of the nation’s peace deal. (AP Photo/Ivan Valencia)

El Grito: Violence in Colombia continues to kill activists

In Colombia, a 2016 peace agreement does not contain the ongoing violence. Violence escalates as criminal armed groups replace the FARC rebels in a violent battle for land and resources.
Police protect a judicial complex where former FARC rebel leader Seuxis Hernandez was standing trial on May 20, 2019. The former peace negotiator has been arrested on drug charges and is now fighting extradition to the United States. AP Photo/Ivan Valencia

Violence climbs in Colombia as president chips away at landmark peace deal with FARC guerrillas

Colombia's new president opposes the 2016 peace deal with the FARC guerrillas. As trust between the government and militants erodes, at least 1,700 former insurgents have returned to armed struggle.
An anti-government protester covers her face with a Venezuelan flag, and uses toothpaste around her eyes to help lessen the effect of tear gas, during clashes with security forces after a rally demanding the resignation of President Nicolas Maduro in Caracas, Venezuela. (AP Photo/Fernando Llano)

Canada’s disturbing indifference to the plight of Venezuelans

Canada has been considered a human rights champion when it comes to accepting Syrian refugees. So why is it doing next to nothing for those fleeing Venezuela?

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