Articles on Diversity

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The restaurants that tend to win awards in Australia are predominantly run by white owners serving European food. Why don’t people of colour get the same attention in the kitchen? Tracey Nearmy/AAP

Why celebrity, award-winning chefs are usually white men

Who has the right to cook 'ethnic' food? And why do Western chefs tend to win all the top awards? The answer: it's complicated.
Could a random admissions process help spare universities from legal trouble and save time and money? Adam Alagna/www.shutterstock.com

Why elite colleges should use a lottery to admit students

Colleges and universities are often criticized for how they admit students from diverse groups. A college admissions scholar suggests an admissions lottery could help make the process more fair.
Students who study abroad gain a competitive edge in the job market, research shows. Dan Korsmayer/www.shutterstock.com

More American students are studying abroad, new data show

In an effort to get a competitive edge in the global jobs market, more US college students are choosing to get international experience, an expert on study abroad says.
Women are still typically the minority on academic hiring committees in science, and “majority rules.” (Shutterstock)

How we can turn the tide for women in science

The award of a Nobel Prize in physics to Donna Strickland is an opportunity to build support for women in science, says one female physics professor.
Opposing demonstrators at a marriage-equality rally in front of the US Supreme Court in April 2015. Elvert Barnes/Flickr

Diversity predicaments on the campus: moral tribalism, free speech, and productive discomfort in a polarised world

Educators must work to ensure inclusion with diverse student bodies, yet it seems inevitable that in today's world, talking about identity issues can be risky and emotional. So how to move forward?
Nervous about how southern television viewers would react, NBC executives closely monitored the filming of the kiss between Nichelle Nichols and William Shatner. U.S. Air Force

TV’s first interracial kiss launched a lifelong career in activism

The career arc of Nichelle Nichols – the first black woman to have a continuing co-starring role on TV – shows how diverse casting can have as much of an impact off the screen as it does on it.
Historically, many American universities helped lay the foundation for eugenics, a pseudoscience used to justify racism. Helioscribe/www.shutterstock.com

For universities, making the case for diversity is part of making amends for racist past

Since US universities once stood at the forefront of the eugenics movement and its racist ideas, they should right the wrongs of the past by pursuing diversity on campus, two scholars argue.
Power over business, democracy and education will likely continue to lie with data and data-dependent tools, such as machine learning and artificial intelligence. Shutterstock

Data ethics is more than just what we do with data, it’s also about who’s doing it

Biases are difficult to shed, which makes workplace diversity a powerful and necessary tool for catching unsuspected bias before it has a chance to cause damage.
LGBTQ+ scientists feel like they have to come out over and over again. Jon Tyson on Unsplash

Why I joined #500queerscientists

In many ways, science can be as much about the people doing it as the science itself. A new online initiative is addressing the invisibility of LGBTQ+ people in science.
What are your in-groups and out-groups? ksenia_bravo/Shutterstock.com

Why our brains see the world as ‘us’ versus ‘them’

Our neural circuits lead us to find comfort in those like us and unease with those who differ, resulting in a battle between reward and distrust. But these brain connections aren't the end of the story.
Science societies are a vital part of research life, creating vital networking, grant and leadership opportunities for researchers. from www.shutterstock.com

A new, data-based checklist to help boost women in science leadership

The young membership, frequency of elections and relaxed networks in science societies may provide vital positive influence for female promotion in STEM.

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