Menu Close

Articles on Freshwater

Displaying 1 - 20 of 52 articles

An aerial view of Georgian Bay, Ont. (Shutterstock)

Canada has 20 per cent of the world’s freshwater reserves — this is how to protect it

Canada has 20 per cent of the world’s freshwater reserves and nine per cent of the world’s renewable freshwater resources. However, there is an urgent need for better freshwater governance in Canada.
Futures won’t affect whether there’s water in the hose. Bettmann/Getty Images

Why Wall Street investors’ trading California water futures is nothing to fear – and unlikely to work anyway

The world’s first futures market for water launched in California in December. Two commodities experts explain how it works, what the potential problems are and why there’s no reason to freak out.
Scarecrows float in an oilsands tailings pond to keep birds from landing, in Fort McMurray, Alta., in June 2017. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jason Franson

New technology makes wastewater from the oilsands industry safer for fish

New regulations will allow oilsands companies to release 1.3 trillion litres of liquid waste into the Athabasca River in 2022. A new technology could clean the wastewater before it’s let go.
Some lakes in the Arctic are expanding and others are disappearing as permafrost thaws. This lake north of Inuvik, N.W.T., is expanding as the ice wedges (darker lines leading away from the lake) around this lake melt and the ground subsides. (Philip Marsh)

Collapsing permafrost is transforming Arctic lakes, ponds and streams

Hundreds of thousands of lakes, rivers and streams in the Arctic exist only because of the permafrost that lies beneath them. The warming Arctic threatens to change that.
A harmful algal bloom in the western basin of Lake Erie in August 2017. (NOAA/Aerial Associates Photography, Inc. by Zachary Haslick/flickr)

Great Lakes waters at risk from buried contaminants and new threats

The Great Lakes contain reservoirs of legacy contaminants, mostly in their sediments, that are vulnerable to resuspension.
Grant Elliott/Unsplash.

Curious Kids: why is the sea salty?

The salt in the sea has built up over billions of years – but it wouldn’t have got there without freshwater rivers and streams.
The giant freshwater prawn is native to the Indo-West Pacific from northwest India to Vietnam, Philippines, New Guinea and northern Australia. It has been introduced into many countries for aquaculture. https://www.shutterstock.com

Breeding single-sex animal populations could help prevent disease and poverty

Entire populations of prawn ‘super-females’ are now being commercially distributed. The science behind this continues to advance and could have a far-reaching impact on both humans and animals.

Top contributors

More