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Articles on Global supply chains

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The EUV-SK1, developed by One Health Medical Technologies with subject matter experts from the University of Saskatchewan. (RMD Engineering, Inc.)

Keeping it local: The story behind a made-in-Saskatchewan COVID-19 emergency-use ventilator

How a veterinarian and a law professor joined a multidisciplinary team to help produce a made-in-Saskatchewan emergency-use ventilator during the COVID-19 pandemic.
On Parliament Hill and at provincial legislatures across the country, politicians must resist pressure from industry and corporate lobbyists amid the COVID-19 pandemic. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick

Governments must resist coronavirus lobbying and focus on long-term transformation

The COVID-19 crisis has raised major questions about the viability of the economic, business and employment models that corporate and industry lobbyists are arguing for a return to.
A seafood counter is shown at a store in Toronto in 2018. A study that year found 61 per cent of seafood products tested at Montréal grocery stores and restaurants were mislabelled. Fish is a common victim of food fraud. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette

Fish, sausage, even honey: Food fraud is hidden in plain sight

Trust in our global food supply chains remains a concern. For the foreseeable future, much of Canada’s food fraud remains hidden in plain sight, sitting right there on our grocery store shelves.
Apple’s wealth is built on a vast and hugely profitable supply chain that relies on low-cost production in Asia. Ym Yik/EPA/AAP

Apple, the $1 trillion company searching for its soul

The company's value exceeds the GDP of many countries, but Apple has human rights, ethical and environmental problems to match in its vast supply chain.
Foxconn was nominated for the 2011 Public Eye Award, which produced this image as part of its campaign to end labour exploitation. Greenpeace Switzerland/flickr

A bloody decade of the iPhone

The first ten years of the iPhone has been a bloody decade of labour abuse, especially in Chinese factories such as those run by Foxconn, the world’s largest electronics manufacturer.
Phone manufacturers, like the Dutch company Fairphone, require suppliers of raw materials used in their phones to improve employment conditions for their workers. Mike Hutchings/Reuters

What businesses can do to stamp out slavery in their supply chains

Businesses can use their purchasing power to change the actions of their suppliers and help to eradicate slavery - both in Australia and across the world.
A war footing for business? DVIDSHUB

Planning for war: a guide for businesses

__The turmoil of 2014 was a timely reminder to businesses that they need to be prepared and have contingency plans for global conflict. The crisis in Ukraine brought Russia and the West to the brink of…

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