Menu Close

Articles on Postpartum

Displaying all articles

Allyson Felix holds her daughter after running the women’s 400-metre dash final at the U.S. Championships athletics meet in Des Moines, Iowa, in 2019. (AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall)

From motherhood to medals: New research sheds light on postpartum guidelines for returning to sport

While there has been large advances and successes for athlete-mothers and progress since the 2020 Tokyo Olympics, there is still work to be done to improve postpartum care and support.
The perinatal period can be hectic. It’s understandable that sex may be on the back burner for a little while. (Shutterstock)

What to expect when you’re expecting: How will your sex life change during pregnancy and postpartum?

Sexual challenges during pregnancy and postpartum are common, but couples often don’t know what to expect when it comes to their sex lives during this time. The good news is that information helps.
Results of a new study show the need for more, easily accessible mental health and social support services for pregnant and postpartum people and their families. (Shutterstock)

Pregnant during the pandemic: Long-term effects and the importance of social support

Being pregnant and giving birth during the pandemic meant disruptions in pregnancy care and birth experiences, as well as detrimental effects on mental health and birth outcomes.
Self-compassion can not only enhance physical and psychological health, but may also influence physical activity in the postpartum period. (Shutterstock)

Heart rate variability and self-compassion: Two tools to help postpartum mothers make exercise decisions

Physical activity and new motherhood can be hard to navigate, but physiological feedback and self-compassion can help inform decisions about when and how to exercise.
Fathers’ brains adjust their structure and function to parenthood. María Paternina-Die

Fatherhood changes men’s brains, according to before-and-after MRI scans

Neuroscientists know that pregnant mothers’ brains change in ways that appear to help with caring for a baby. Now researchers have identified changes in new fathers’ brains, too.
The gift of sleep, time, self-care (“me time”) and a message of what a remarkable job she is doing may be what new mothers need most this Mother’s Day. (Shutterstock)

Helping new moms return to exercise and leisure supports their physical and mental health

Mothers with young children are consistently identified as having lower levels of physical activity and leisure opportunities, which place their physical and mental health at risk.
Many women feel there is inadequate support for exercise after the birth of a child, stating a need for more information from health-care professionals about guidelines for returning to physical activity. (Shutterstock)

Returning to exercise postpartum: Supporting women’s physical activity after the birth of a child

When asked about postpartum exercise, women were curious about strategies and recommendations for physical activity after the birth of a child, including finding the time, energy and motivation.

Top contributors

More