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Articles on Prosthetics

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The brain responds differently to natural touch on a finger versus a direct electrical stimulation. Sebastian Kaulitzki/Science Photo Library

Restoring touch through electrodes implanted in the human brain will require engineering around a sensory lag

When designing neuroprosthetic devices for users to control with their thoughts, engineers must take into account the sensory information brains collect from the environment and how it gets processed.
Bernard Tobey, a double amputee, and his son, wearing Union sailor uniforms, standing beside a small wagon displaying Secretary of War Edwin Stanton’s dispatch on the fall of Fort Fisher. Fetter's New Photograph Gallery/Library of Congress

How the Civil War drove medical innovation – and the pandemic could, too

Lessons from history make clear that the federal government can spur medical innovation in a crisis, including this pandemic. Providing certainty and clarity is critical.
Tiny fuel cells convert sweat to electricity that can power sensors in electronic skin. Yu et al., Sci. Robot. 5, eaaz7946 (2020)

A smart second skin gets all the power it needs from sweat

Lightweight, flexible materials can be used to make health-monitoring wearable devices, but powering the devices is a challenge. Using fuel cells instead of batteries could make the difference.
Advances in technology mean it’s now possible to 3D print everything from prosthetic limbs to skin, bones and organs. armymedicine/flickr

Proposed new regulations for 3D printed medical devices must go further

Who should be legally responsible when 3D printed devices fail? Proposed changes to the Therapeutic Goods Administration’s regulatory framework have the potential to settle that question.
Surgeons at the University of Saskatchewan use a 3D printed human brain to plan complex neurosurgical procedures for patients with movement disorders.

3D printers: A revolutionary frontier for medicine

From cheap prosthetic arms for landmine victims in Sudan to the promise of surgery on astronauts in space — 3D printing is sparking a healthcare revolution.
Technology makes an impact on various events, but the key is to let the athlete’s ability shine through. OIS

Technology matters in the Paralympics, but the athlete matters more

Technology has had a particularly visible impact on the Paralympics. But the the most important thing is to let the athlete’s ability come to the fore.

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