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Articles on Public transit

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Future transportation design should address inequality and not exacerbate it. (Shutterstock)

Sci-fi shows like ‘Westworld’ and ‘Altered Carbon’ offer a glimpse into the future of urban transportation

Moving around cities will change in the future as new technologies like self-driving cars gain wider adoption. Science fiction can give us a glimpse into these futures.
Ontario Progressive Conservative Party Leader Doug Ford, Ontario New Democratic Party Leader Andrea Horwath, Ontario Liberal Party Leader Steven Del Duca and Green Party of Ontario Leader Mike Schreiner debate during the Ontario party leaders’ debate in May 2022. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Frank Gunn

The Ontario election campaign produced some surprisingly good ideas for Canada

Some excellent ideas were proposed during the Ontario election on everything from transit to housing. Here’s why the rest of Canada would be wise to consider them.
Self-driving cars could lead to increased traffic and pollution if they spur more travel by car. Witthaya Prasongsin via Getty Images

Driverless cars won’t be good for the environment if they lead to more auto use

Studies show that when people can ride in a car without having to operate it, they increase their car use. That could increase traffic and pollution, unless government puts a price on car travel.
Interstate 980 cuts off West Oakland, Calif., at top, from other Oakland neighborhoods. Jane Tyska/Digital First Media/East Bay Times via Getty Images

Removing urban highways can improve neighborhoods blighted by decades of racist policies

Two urban policy experts explain why taking down highways that have isolated low-income and minority neighborhoods for decades is an important part of the pending infrastructure bill.
People are shoulder to shoulder inside a city bus while commuting at rush hour during the COVID-19 pandemic in Toronto. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette

As people continue working from home, the monthly transit pass needs to change to remain worth it

Increasing even part-time remote work disrupts public transit revenue. Agencies need to adapt fare structures and business models to meet the changing work market.
It’s back: Rush-hour traffic in Los Angeles on June 15, 2021. Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

As urban life resumes, can US cities avert gridlock?

The pandemic offered a tantalizing look at city life with fewer cars in the picture. But with traffic rebounding, there’s limited time to lock in policies that make streets more people-friendly.
Greyhound has permanently shut down its intercity bus service in Canada. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld 

Canada needs a national public transportation system — here’s why

Many communities in Canada currently lack intercity and regional transportation. A national public transportation system would improve connectedness between cities and access to essential services.
Governments could capitalize on the growth of telecommuting to promote more car-free lifestyles. (AP Photo/Fernando Vergara)

COVID-19 could end our dependence on cars — if we ‘build back better’

The pandemic could be a boon to car use, but it would be a mistake for governments to let that happen. There’s a golden opportunity to push towards a zero-carbon transportation system.
The world takes tentative steps to get back up and running amid the COVID-19 pandemic, but our post-pandemic world will look different than how we lived and worked before. (Pixabay)

Coronavirus weekly: recovery efforts happening in fits and starts

Our experts look at recovery efforts, how different the post-pandemic world will be, the hunt for a cure for COVID-19, and why we need to mind our mental health.
New research suggests many Canadians cannot afford to forgo public transit during the COVID-19 pandemic — or ever. Jed Dela Cruz/Unsplash

Giving up public transit during the coronavirus is a luxury many Canadians can’t afford

Many of Canada’s residents, including essential workers, have no choice but to ride transit. Service cuts may cripple their access to essential destinations if governments do not intervene.

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