Articles on Stem cells

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Marius Wernig, Thomas C. Südhof and their colleagues created these “Induced neuronal (iN) cells” from adult human blood cells. Marius Wernig

Neurons made from blood cells – a new tool for understanding brain diseases

Figuring out what causes diseases like autism, schizophrenia and depression is tricky. Now Stanford University researchers are turning blood into brain cells to study these diseases in a dish.
Google co-founder Sergey Brin arrives for the Breakthrough Prize in Life Sciences awards on Dec. 12, 2013, in Moffett Field, Calif. The Breakthrough Prize in Life Sciences recognizes excellence in research aimed at curing intractable diseases and extending human life. (AP Photo/Ben Margot)

Could this be the year for a Canadian Breakthrough Prize in Life Sciences?

The nomination deadline for science's most lucrative prize -- the Breakthrough Prize -- is looming. Why has no Canadian ever received this prize, despite groundbreaking discoveries?
Only one Canadian researcher has ever received the Nobel Prize for medicine, for the discovery of insulin in 1923. And yet Canadians have been essential to developments in stem cell research, gene sequencing and treatments for cancer and brain trauma. (Shutterstock)

Why can’t Canada win another Nobel Prize in medicine?

Only one Canadian has ever received the Nobel Prize for medicine, in 1923. But Canadian discoveries have been essential to stem cell research, gene sequencing and treatments for cancer.
Stem cells have saved thousands of lives thanks to their applications in cancer treatments. Many other uses peddled by private clinics are without evidence. from www.shutterstock.com

Private clinics’ peddling of unproven stem cell treatments is unsafe and unethical

Stem cell science continues to offer great promise. But a growing number of clinics are selling treatments without evidence that what they offer is effective – or even safe.
Scientists hope that stem cells may be able to repair nerves and other cells that support transmission of electrical impulses in the spinal cord. binomialphoto/flickr

Yes there’s hope, but treating spinal injuries with stem cells is not a reality yet

Claims that stem cell treatments can repair spinal injuries right now are overblown. But it's not for lack of trying, and the science is certainly progressing.
Controversy surrounds the link between Australian of the Year Alan Mackay Sim’s research and a Polish team who restored mobility for a paraplegic man. AAP/Mick Tsikas

The future of stem cells: tackling hype versus hope

For many people suffering from disabling conditions, announcements in the press around breakthroughs in stem cell research undoubtedly bring hope.

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