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Articles on Urban gardening

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Despite help from the government and charities, the number of food-insecure kids is rising. NurPhoto/Getty Images

18 million US children are at risk of hunger: How is the problem being addressed and what more can be done?

An estimated 1 in 4 US children have trouble getting enough to eat at least sometimes. We asked four scholars for their insights..
Affluent neighborhoods have very different microbes from those in poor ones. Zentangle/Shutterstock.com

Inequity takes a toll on your gut microbes, too

You probably know about the collection of microorganisms that live in, on and around us. But did you know that not everyone in society has equal access to them? That needs to change.
Sunflowers and luffa vines — related to cucumber, gourd and squash — are tended by a Community Roots participant and mentor in a Brooklyn school community garden with their instructor (right). (Pieranna Pieroni)

At a New York City garden, students grow their community roots and critical consciousness

Urban gardening is a departure point for learning about land and relationships, as well as food, consumer culture and social activism.
St Canice’s rooftop garden, where a horticultural therapy program demonstrated its benefits for mental health and wellbeing.

Biophilic urbanism: how rooftop gardening soothes souls

In a world of increasing urbanisation, density, pressure and, some say, isolation, there's a natural salve for stress, pressure and mental illness. And it’s right above our heads.
Keep the climate in mind when you’re choosing what to plant. shutterstock

How do we keep gardening in the face of a changing climate?

Plant species are reacting to climate change by adapting or migrating to better conditions. But this is not an option for gardens, so gardeners will have to be smarter about what they plant and where.

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