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Articles on Water footprint

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Soon robotic smart tractors will drive themselves through fields and will use data to plant the right seed in the right place and give each plant exactly the right amount of fertilizer, cutting down on energy, pollution and waste. (Shutterstock)

3 technologies poised to change food and the planet

Year round local food production is within our grasp, and will slash agriculture's climate impact — but only if we embrace agricultural technology.
India’s civil society has opposed engineering-based water management such as large dams, river linking and canal irrigation, for environmental and social reasons, but often ideological reasons. www.unsplash.com/@akshat_agrawal11

How India’s civil society can shape the country’s water policy

India's civil society, which for the past 30 years has been critical of India's water policies, now has the opportunity to drive the policy recommendations for water management.
By centrally controlling when household water heaters (geysers) can be switched on and off, South Africa can ease up electricity demand during peak consumption times. Shutterstock

Smart water heating could help in South Africa’s energy crisis

Centrally switching water heaters on and off at specific times can distribute the demand for electricity and lead to energy saving.
Eating less meat is one change many of us can make to reduce our contribution to climate change. from www.shutterstock.com

Climate explained: what each of us can do to reduce our carbon footprint

Individual actions to reduce emissions are important in two ways. First, they have an immediate impact, and secondly, adopting low-carbon life choices sends a clear message to political leaders.
Government negligence, rampant development and illegal land clearing spark wildfires in Indonesia that annually ravage thousands of acres of forest. AP Photo

Resource depletion is a serious problem, but ‘footprint’ estimates don’t tell us much about it

July 29, 2019 is 'Earth Overshoot Day,' a date coined by the nonprofit Global Footprint Network to publicize overuse of Earth's resources. But their estimates may actually understate the problem.

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