Menu Close

Articles on Cultured meat

Displaying all articles

The demise of factory farming will have many social benefits. (Piqsels)

Looking forward to a future without factory farming

The end of factory farming will lay the foundation for a rural resurgence and the development of more just and sustainable communities for people and animals alike.
With lab meat technology still in its infancy, it’s a good time to consider the social and cultural challenges that may become more amplified in North American food systems with the advent of clean meats. (Shutterstock)

Lab-grown meat could leave marginalized people in need

If lab-grown meat is truly going to be the next frontier in ethical eating, it’s important to consider who's most at risk of being left behind in the race to develop it.
An Indonesian traditional seaweed farm in Nusa Penuda, Bali. (Shutterstock)

Insects, seaweed and lab-grown meat could be the foods of the future

Awareness is increasing about foods like lab-grown meat, insects and seaweed. These foods may help address environmental challenges, but it's important to be aware of both the costs and benefits.
Meat of the future might be quite different from meat of the past. Stanley Kubrick, photographer, LOOK Magazine Photograph Collection, Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division, LC-USZ6-2352.

So far cultured meat has been burgers – the next big challenge is animal-free steaks

It's relatively easy to grow a bunch of animal cells to turn into a burger. But to grow a steak made of cultured meat is a trickier task. Bioengineers must create organized, three-dimensional tissues.
Lab-grown or cultured meat, when done at scale, will be an industrial process with significant energy requirements. Beck Diefenbach/Reuters

Why cows are getting a bad rap in lab-grown meat debate

Despite many claims, nobody knows for sure how the environmental footprint of lab-grown meat compares to livestock. An animal scientist says the issue is not black and white.
Interested in a juicy burger grown in the lab? Oliver Sjöström/Unsplash

Would you eat ‘meat’ from a lab? Consumers aren’t necessarily sold on ‘cultured meat’

Cultured meat comes from cells in a lab, not muscles in an animal. While regulatory and technological aspects are being worked out, less is known about whether people are up for eating this stuff.
The world’s first lab-grown beef burger, the result of years of research by Dutch scientist Mark Post at the University of Maastricht. Reuters/David Parry/pool

No animal required, but would people eat artificial meat?

We might be able to grow artificial meat but are people really prepared to eat such produce over meat from farmed animals?
Dr Mark Post and his bred-in-a-bucket burger. Would you? David Parry/PA

Eight questions that need answers about lab-bred meat

The launch of the lab-bred “meat” in London was a masterly act of timing, theatre, and media management. But now that rabbit is out of the hat, there are questions that need to be asked, and answers that…
Forget the farm – meat can be grown in a petri dish. But is it a ‘world first’? EPA/David Parry

World’s first lab-grown burger? Don’t forget the semi-living steak

When “the world’s first laboratory-grown burger” was unveiled, cooked and eaten last week, the story received saturation news coverage. But was it really the first? Or was this story served up to a ravenous…

Top contributors

More