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Articles on Cellular agriculture

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Dairy cows in the Fraser Valley, B.C. (Evan Bowness)

Milk without the cow: Cellular agriculture could be the future of farming, but dairy farmers need help

Technological changes on the horizon will likely disrupt the dairy industry as we know it — plans to mitigate the risks this transition poses to farmer livelihoods and animal welfare should start now.
The future of protein includes lab-grown meat and plant-based meat alternatives. (Shutterstock)

Lab-grown meats and cow-free dairy can meet the demand for protein and help address climate change

Technological advancements in food production have created new ways to meet the growing demand for protein. Canada’s investment in this industry may create jobs and reduce carbon emissions.
Soon robotic smart tractors will drive themselves through fields and will use data to plant the right seed in the right place and give each plant exactly the right amount of fertilizer, cutting down on energy, pollution and waste. (Shutterstock)

3 technologies poised to change food and the planet

Year round local food production is within our grasp, and will slash agriculture's climate impact — but only if we embrace agricultural technology.
Meat of the future might be quite different from meat of the past. Stanley Kubrick, photographer, LOOK Magazine Photograph Collection, Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division, LC-USZ6-2352.

So far cultured meat has been burgers – the next big challenge is animal-free steaks

It’s relatively easy to grow a bunch of animal cells to turn into a burger. But to grow a steak made of cultured meat is a trickier task. Bioengineers must create organized, three-dimensional tissues.
Lab-grown or cultured meat, when done at scale, will be an industrial process with significant energy requirements. Beck Diefenbach/Reuters

Why cows are getting a bad rap in lab-grown meat debate

Despite many claims, nobody knows for sure how the environmental footprint of lab-grown meat compares to livestock. An animal scientist says the issue is not black and white.
Interested in a juicy burger grown in the lab? Oliver Sjöström/Unsplash

Would you eat ‘meat’ from a lab? Consumers aren’t necessarily sold on ‘cultured meat’

Cultured meat comes from cells in a lab, not muscles in an animal. While regulatory and technological aspects are being worked out, less is known about whether people are up for eating this stuff.

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