Articles on Marine pollution

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Plastic bags, balloons, and rope fragments were among more than 100 pieces of plastic in the gut of a single turtle. Qamar Schuyler

How much plastic does it take to kill a turtle? Typically just 14 pieces

Autopsies of 1,000 turtles washed up on Australian beaches paint a grim picture of the impact of plastic debris. Even a single piece can be deadly, and on average 14 pieces equals a 50% fatality rate.
A whale shark moves towards a piece of plastic in the ocean. (Shutterstock)

Not all marine fish eat plastics

If we are truly invested in addressing the issue of marine plastic and offsetting the potential harms, we have to understand which fish eat plastic and which ones don't.
Eating raw oysters can put you at risk of food-borne illnesses, such as norovirus, hepatitis A and salmonella. And, sadly, hot sauce, lemon juice and alcohol do not reduce the risks. (Shutterstock))

Why you may never eat raw oysters again

In the wake of a norovirus outbreak traced to raw oysters from British Columbia, our expert explains how to eat this culinary delicacy safely.
Healthy aquatic vegetation in the Chesapeake Bay. Cassie Gurbisz/University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science

Cutting pollution in the Chesapeake Bay has helped underwater grasses rebound

An ambitious plan to cut the flow of nutrients into the Chesapeake Bay has produced historic regrowth of underwater seagrasses. These results offer hope for other polluted water bodies.
Water quality is one of the major issues that threatens the Great Barrier Reef’s health. AAP Image/Dan Peled

The new Great Barrier Reef pollution plan is better, but still not good enough

The updated plan for improving water quality on the Great Barrier Reef still doesn't address the need to curb intensively farmed crops such as sugar cane, and to enforce existing environmental laws.
A man stretches his leg on the bank of the Han River as a ship passes by amid thick haze. Tens of thousands of premature deaths in east Asia every year are caused by shipping pollution. REUTERS/Stringer

Three ways to improve commercial shipping’s environmental footprint

The merchant navy – some 20,000 ships – carries the vast majority of trade goods around the world. Unfortunately, they also spew toxic pollutants that harm people and the environment.
Popular tourist destination Kuta beach in Bali, Indonesia, is regularly covered in waste, most of it plastic that washes ashore during the rainy season. This picture was taken on February 15, 2016. Wira Suryantala/Antara/Reuters

Indonesia vows to tackle marine pollution

Marine plastic pollution is a global problem. Bali's beaches present prime examples and an opportunity to study the socio-economic effects this has on coastal communities.
Around 94% of litter on South African beaches is made of plastic, of which 77% is packaging. Peter Ryan

Five applications where plastic is not fantastic

Waste plastic affects marine life significantly but better education and recyclable plastics could go a long way in resolving this issue.
Sperm whales, like many other species, use echolocation which can be hampered by noise. Gabriel Barathieu/Wikimedia Commons

It’s time to speak up about noise pollution in the oceans

We tend to think of the oceans as quiet, when in fact they're anything but. Noise is the "forgotten pollutant", but the good news is that unlike many other pollutants it can be switched off if we try.

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