Articles on Biometrics

Displaying 1 - 20 of 29 articles

Jeremy Lee, a sawmill worker in Imbil, Queensland, refused to have his fingerprints scanned for a new security system introduced by his employer to replace swipe cards. www.shutterstock.com

As privacy is lost a fingerprint at a time, a biometric rebel asserts our rights

Biometric data is forever. Any employer seeking to collect it has big obligations to meet. And employees have the right to object.
Biometrics like retinal scans is a new frontier in the privacy wars. Reuters/Mike Blake

Congress is considering privacy legislation – be afraid

States like California have been at the forefront of privacy innovation in recent decades. A possible federal law could bring their experimentation to a halt, harming consumers.
A test subject entering a brain password. Wenyao Xu, et al.

My thoughts are my password, because my brain reactions are unique

Biometrics are more secure than passwords – but when they're compromised fingerprints and retina scans are hard to reset. Brain responses to specific stimuli are as secure and, crucially, resettable.
An artist’s depiction of the ‘shibboleth incident.’ Detail from art by H. de Blois, from The Bible and Its Story Taught by One Thousand Picture Lessons, vol. 3, edited by Charles F. Horne and Julius A. Bewer, 1908

The long history, and short future, of the password

Going as far back as the Bible, and as widely known as the phrase 'Open, Sesame,' passwords are a textual link to our past. But they may not be around much longer.
Mapping a face is the starting point. Anton Watman/shutterstock.com

Facial recognition is increasingly common, but how does it work?

Computers are getting better at identifying people's faces, and while that can be helpful as well as worrisome. To properly understand the legal and privacy ramifications, we need to know how facial recognition technology works.

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