Articles on BRCA2

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Breast cancer type 1 (BRCA1) is a human tumor suppressor gene, found in all humans. Its protein, also called by the synonym BRCA1, is responsible for repairing DNA. ibreakstock/Shutterstock.com

Gene-editing technique CRISPR identifies dangerous breast cancer mutations

Mutations in BRCA genes are linked to the early onset of breast and ovarian cancers. But the effect of most mutations is unclear. Now new research can distinguish harmless from dangerous mutations.
By In The Light Photography/shutterstock.com

What’s in your genome? Parents-to-be want to know

We now have the capacity to quickly and cheaply sequence an individual's genome and scour it for disease-causing genes. But how much, and what type, of information does a parent-to-be want to know?
Genetic testing for breast cancer gene mutations is now available. But it could lead to over treatment. Fotos593/Shutterstock.com

As genetic testing for breast cancer gene mutation expands, questions arise about treatment decisions

A genetics testing company recently won approval from the FDA to market a test that can identify a breast cancer gene mutation. But what are women supposed to do with that information? There's risk involved.
Tomas Lindahl, pictured here in the lab, along with Paul Modrich and Aziz Sancar, received the Nobel Prize for Chemistry. EPA/FACUNDO ARRIZABALAGA

Nobel Prize in Chemistry highlights how our bodies can repair our fragile DNA

The recipients of this year's Nobel Prize for Chemistry showed that DNA is far from static. Rather, it is bombarded by damaging forces, but our bodies know how to repair these precious strands.
Australia’s Federal Court last year rejected Ms D'Arcy’s appeal and ruled companies could patent genes they isolated. Dan Peled/Shutterstock

Remind me again, how can companies patent breast cancer genes?

The High Court challenge is the last resort for Ms D'Arcy's test case against companies patenting human genes and has implications for patients, clinicians and researchers.
A gene patent means only the patent-holder has the right to undertake research and development involving that gene. Shutterstock

Four things you should know about gene patents

The Federal Court’s decision that gene patenting is permitted in Australia will have ramifications for all gene patents, even though the case involved only one gene associated with breast cancer. A gene…
The case was brought on behalf of cancer survivor Yvonne D'Arcy. DAN PELED/AAP

Australian federal court upholds gene patents

A Federal Court decision to allow gene patents could open the way for existing patents to be enforced more strongly in Australia…
The decision may impact on an impending Australian appeal. Image from shutterstock.com

Top US court blocks patents on breast cancer genes

All nine members of the US Supreme Court have ruled that isolated genetic material cannot be patented – unless the material is markedly different to what exists in nature. The court ruled against Myriad…
Angelina Jolie’s double mastectomy has sparked a series of reports about preventative surgery. PA/Alastair Grant

Greater access to genetic testing in NHS will help cancer fight

Following Hollywood actress Angelina Jolie’s revelation last week that she’d undergone a double mastectomy to prevent breast cancer, it has emerged that a 53-year-old man had his prostate removed after…
Angelina Jolie should be seen as a model for seeking information about her options and making a decision that best suited her. EPA/Facundo Arrizabalaga

Panicking about breast cancer? Here’s what you need to know

Angelina Jolie’s recent announcement about her double mastectomy likely caused many women to think about their own chance of developing breast cancer. But before you rush off to have a bunch of possibly…

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