Articles on Breast Cancer

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Cancer cells, in red, cannibalize a type of stem cell, shown in green. The red cells with small specks of green are breast cancer cells that have “eaten” the stem cell. Author provided.

How ‘cannibalism’ by breast cancer cells promotes dormancy: A possible clue into cancer recurrence

After treatment for breast cancer, many women receive the news that they are cancer-free. In many cases, the disease will come back. How and why does that happen? New findings offer an explanation.
Doctors and patients should appreciate the many roles estrogens play in the body. Doctor and patient image via www.shutterstock.com.

What women with breast cancer should know about estrogens

Estrogens also have many positive effects on mental health, cognitive function, libido and protection of the brain, possibly even slowing the onset of Alzheimer’s disease.
Age-standardised cancer death rates have been falling in Australia. from shutterstock.com

How Australians Die: cause #2 – cancers

Currently, seven cancer types are listed in the top 20 causes of death in Australia. These are cancers of the lung, blood and lymph, bowel, prostate, breast, pancreas, skin and some childhood cancers.
Stigma is likely exacerbated by our many ‘pink’ campaigns to raise breast cancer awareness and improve outcomes for women.

Breast cancer campaigns might be pink, but men get it too

Although breast cancer is usually seen as a woman’s disease, around 145 Australian men were diagnosed with breast cancer in 2015, and around 25 died from it.
Prolonged periods of stress can aid in the spread of cancer. from shutterstock.com

Chronic stress effects help cancer spread, researchers find

Chronic stress accelerates cancer growth in mice, according to a new study, pointing to potential treatment targets to slow the progression of cancer to other organs.
Understanding the DNA of tumours allows researchers to target treatment to each individual. Erika/Flickr

How cancer doctors use personalised medicine to target variations unique to each tumour

Personalised medicine is based on the idea that by understanding the specific molecular code of a person’s disease, and particularly its genetic makeup, we can more accurately tailor treatment.
Young women in Kano, northern Nigeria. Access to cancer screening in the region is particularly problematic. Reuters/Goran Tomasevic

What’s stopping Nigerian women from being screened for cancer?

Women in northern Nigeria are not going for cancer screenings early enough. There are myriad social, cultural and economic reasons for this. But early detection would save their lives.

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