Articles on France

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On March 7, 2019, demonstrators gathered outside the National Assembly in Paris. The sign above reads “Deputies, please save the climate”. The one in front reads “Fossilise the future?” Bertrand Guay/AFP

France and Britain in a race for carbon neutrality by 2050

By enacting a legislative framework to achieve carbon neutrality, France and the United Kingdom are making a difference in the fight against climate change.
People holding German flags take part in a rally organised by Germany’s far-right Alternative for Germany (AfD) party on May 1, 2019 in Chemnitz, eastern Germany. Hendrik Schmidt/AFP

The impact of immigration on EU countries’ nationalistic sentiments

Nationalism seems to be on the rise in Europe, with many parties hostile to immigration. But what role does immigration itself have their support? Research shows some unexpected impacts.
US marines walk through the rebuilt palace of King Nebuchadnezzar, in the ancient town of Babylon, in April 2003. The ruins suffered serious damage when American troops set up a military base amid the ruins during the Iraq War. Reuters/Jerry Lampen

‘World Heritage’ site selection is Eurocentric – and that shapes which historic places get love and money

A scholar analyzed data about UNESCO World Heritage sites to explain why European cultural relics like Notre Dame are so beloved, while splendid monuments elsewhere remain relatively unknown.
On May 16, 2019, Madeleine Munier Apaire (shown here in June 2014), lawyer for Vincent Lambert’s nephew, considered that all remedies were “exhausted”. Eric Feferberg/AFP

Vincent Lambert: what are the legal and ethical issues?

The debate over Mr. Vincent Lambert's decision to discontinue his care overshadowed equally important judicial and ethical issues. A look back at a complex situation that will set a precedent.
Antoine Arnault (second from left), son of Bernard Arnault and member of the LVMH board of directors, visited the Notre-Dame de Paris Cathedral the day after the fire. Christophe Petit Tesson/AFP

The profane and the sacred: why luxury firms rushed to support Notre-Dame

The biggest names in France’s luxury industry have given millions of euros to help rebuild Notre Dame. Questioning why they would do so overlooks the deep historical and religious roots of the industry.
Filmmaker Agnes Varda holds the Honorary Palme d'Or award at the 68th international film festival, Cannes, France. Varda, a central figure of the French New Wave who later won the Golden Lion at the Venice Film Festival, has died. She was 90. AP/Thibault Camus

Agnès Varda, a pioneering artist who saw the extraordinary in the ordinary

Beloved film director Agnès Varda died at age 90, on March 29th. She was a pioneer of French New Wave cinema and admired for her ability to understand time and see beauty outside of mechanical norms.
The grief expressed at the Notre Dame fire is not just because it is a beautiful building – some places become more important to us because of history, culture and our own memories of them. Julien De Rosa/EPA/AAP

Why are we so moved by the plight of the Notre Dame?

Images of Notre Dame on fire have elicited an outpouring of grief around the world and online. This response raises the question of why we feel more connected to some heritage places than others.
This large ‘Do Not Forget Australia’ sign in a yard at the Victoria school in Villers-Bretonneux, is the heir of smaller signs once placed in classrooms by Australian authorities. Author provided

Friday essay: do ‘the French’ care about Anzac?

Since the end of the first world war, the Australian media has often reported that ‘the French’ care about, remember and even venerate the Anzacs. But is this true? And which French people?

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