Articles on Genomics

Displaying 41 - 55 of 55 articles

Behold the femur. Bence Viola, MPI EVA

Ancient human bone reveals when we bred with Neanderthals

When a human bone was found on a gravelly riverbank by a bone-carver who was searching for mammoth ivory, little did he know it would provide the oldest modern-human genome yet sequenced. The anatomically…
You can never be too safe. government_press_office

Households are new source of antibiotic-resistant superbug

Human skin is a garden of microbes which is home to about 1,000 bacterial species. Most are benign but some invade the skin and cause illness – and of these, antibiotic resistant bacteria are particularly…
Genome sequencing has the potential to improve the diagnosis of conditions caused by changes in the DNA. Image from shutterstock.com

Treating illness and preventing disease with genetic testing

Rapid technological advances mean it’s faster and cheaper than ever to read a person’s entire genetic code, known as the genome. Genomic sequencing has two potential applications in health: the care of…
Before the technology can used more widely, we need to ensure its use will bring improvements in health, quality and duration of life. Image from shutterstock.com

Cheap genome tests to predict future illness? Don’t hold your breath

Sydney’s Garvan Institute is this week promoting its acquisition of an Illumina machine which it says can sequence the whole human genome for $1,000. The institute hopes genomic sequencing will become…
Whole genome sequencing can help identify the source of the antibiotic resistance. Shutterstock

Genomic analysis could help win the fight against superbugs

Some recent headlines from Australian newspapers: NSW hospitals worst place for Golden Staph; CA-MRSA - the killer in our midst; Superbug onslaught. By now, most people are aware that antibiotic-resistant…
Barbara, 14-year-old sister of Terézia Hausmann, who was found in the same crypt. Ildiko Pap

How a 200-year-old mummy revealed secrets of TB

In 1994, a crypt containing 242 bodies was discovered in Vác, Hungary. Many of the bodies were naturally mummified, including the remains of a woman, Terézia Hausmann, who died apparently from tuberculosis…
Allowing patents that capture categories of unique genomic DNA damages the principle of open access. Nestlé/Flickr

Ensure open access to genetic data to protect innovation

Public investment in the Human Genome Project was expected to deliver a global public good that would help generate scientific breakthroughs. But open access to our genetic blueprint is a precondition…
Close-up of a sculptural representation of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), the basic building block of nearly all organisms. ἀλέξ/Flickr

An insider’s account of the Human Genome Project

The Human Genome Project (HGP) – to put it simply – has changed science. It has contributed to making biology the science of the 21st century, as physics was the science of the 20th century. It has driven…
Genes aren’t the be-all-and-end-all - there are other factors that influence you. Cayusa

Are you a mutant? Genes matter, but there’s more to life …

Are you a mutant? Am I? The advent of personal genomics makes this question less like a Marvel Comics story idea than it did in the past. But, as Spiderman’s uncle Ben might have put it: with great power…
More than 99.5% of the genome is identical between two humans, but that still leaves 15m positions to search through. fdecomite

Personal genomics: where science fiction meets reality

Imagine a future where doctors take a strand of your hair or a drop of your blood and tell you your DNA predicts a 78% risk of developing heart disease. On the plus side, it also predicts exactly which…

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