Articles on gut microbes

Displaying all articles

Diet reduces risk of depression through actions on bacteria in the gut, the immune system and the brain. from www.shutterstock.com

Food as medicine: your brain really does want you to eat more veggies

A world-first trial showed depression is reduced after just three months following a diet rich in vegetables, fruits, wholegrains, legumes, fish, lean red meats, olive oil and nuts.
Micro changes have macro results. Darryl Leja, National Human Genome Research Institute, National Institutes of Health

Circadian rhythms and the microbiome: Disrupting daily routine of gut microbes can be bad news for whole body

New research suggests our gut microbes have their own circadian rhythms that in turn influence our organ functions. Is this an explanation for how disrupting our daily patterns can cause health problems?
Betty Aneyumel from the Karamoja tribe rakes fermented millet to prepare a local alcoholic drink in Moroto, eastern Uganda. Reuters/Euan Denholm

What ancient African fermentation techniques reveal about probiotics

There's more to fermented foods than a good meal. Scientists are learning just how such foods encourage the growth of probiotics and how this keeps people healthy.
They say you are what you eat, and we’re learning that a bad diet might mean bad moods and bad behaviour. from www.shutterstock.com.au

How your meal affects your mood

Your thoughts, moods and behaviours are the product of your brain. What you eat affects the chemicals in your brain, and thus your moods and behaviours.

Top contributors

More