Articles on political parties

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Australia’s political leaders were silent on a number of key issues during the election campaign. AAP/Lukas Coch

Are Australia’s political parties past their use-by date?

The problem confronting political parties is that the people in leadership positions are intellectually and emotionally ill-equipped to grasp the complex transformation in human affairs now under way.
The Economic Freedom Fighters recently launched their manifesto in Soweto. Party leader Julius Malema (waving) is the master of political theatre. EPA/Cornell Tukiri

South Africa’s EFF: excellent politics of props and imagination

Red berets, hard hats, overalls and domestic workers’ uniforms have become a prominent part of South African politics. But these are more than just props for the EFF political party.
Rod Webber before a Marco Rubio rally in Exeter, New Hampshire. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri

Did independent voters decide the New Hampshire primary?

NH’s election laws allow people to vote in the primaries even if they are not registered with one of the parties. How pivotal are these unenrolled voters? We look beyond the exit polls for answers.
On many major issues, Labor’s Bill Shorten and the Liberals’ Tony Abbott are essentially two wings of the same bird. AAP/Mick Tsikas

A challenged democracy: wicked problems and political failures

The crisis of public confidence in politics is not limited to Australia, but public disengagement, retail politics and lack of vision are crippling our ability to tackle long-term and wicked problems.
Like Italian politician Silvio Berlusconi (right), PUP leader Clive Palmer heads up what can be termed a ‘personal’ party. AAP/EPA/Alan Porritt/Angelo Carconi

Why Clive Palmer’s personal party is doomed to end in tears

While Silvio Berlusconi has shown himself to be adept at transferring business organisational and marketing skills to politics, Clive Palmer has appeared completely out of his depth in this sense.
A core problem for Treasurer Joe Hockey is that the public doesn’t share the Abbott government’s fervour for budget cuts and market policies. AAP/Mick Tsikas

What price the public good when governing parties bow to markets?

The recent losses of first-term governments in Queensland and Victoria suggests that some of the assumed verities of political process are being challenged. These results and the rapid shifting legitimacy…
Odd one out? Jacqui Lambie walks past her Palmer United Party colleagues earlier this week. AAP/Lukas Coch

Lacking a unifying purpose or policies, PUP is falling apart

After holding itself together for four-and-a-half months, potentially fatal cracks are appearing in the Palmer United Party (PUP). With fellow senators claiming that she refuses to attend party meetings…
To find a revolution in campaigning comparable with micro-targeting you have to look back beyond the ‘Kevin 07’ online pitch to Gough Whitlam’s 1972’s TV-driven ‘It’s Time’ triumph. AAP/Dan Peled

Big Data meets doorknocking: the political contest’s new frontier

Australian election campaigns are facing another revolutionary change, which has the potential to transform the electoral contest, redefine campaign funding and even revive political parties. The “micro-targeting…
In joining the South Australian government, Martin Hamilton-Smith has caused outrage in a political system in which party loyalty outweighs all other considerations . AAP/Ben Macmahon

Political loyalty, splits and rats: the case of Martin Hamilton-Smith

The defection of former Liberal leader Martin Hamilton-Smith from his party to join the South Australian Labor government as a cabinet minister has caused outrage among his former colleagues. He has broken…
Who disagrees with mom today? Iowapolitics.com

Can home schooling make kids more politically tolerant?

When it comes to the topic of conservative Christian home schooling, the term “politically tolerant” usually doesn’t spring to mind. Even while the home schooling phenomenon continues to grow and diversify…
While reporters’ political biases are always hotly debated, other biases remain - including too few voices from diverse backgrounds. AAP/Alan Porritt

Whose views skew the news? Media chiefs ready to vote out Labor, while reporters lean left

Most Australian journalists describe themselves as left-wing, yet amongst those who wield the real power in the country’s newsrooms, the Coalition holds a winning lead. But while the media’s political…

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