Articles on Sleeping

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We know that lots of animals, maybe all animals, sleep. Cats, dogs, even worms and jellyfish sleep. But we still don’t know exactly why they started sleeping. Marcella Cheng/The Conversation

Curious Kids: Do animals sleep like people? Do snails sleep in their shells?

Pond snails use things like rocks or the side of their aquarium as their bed, attaching themselves while they sleep. This might not seem very relaxing but their shells do hang away from their body.
Cars are often warm and comfortable and we are usually feeling safe and relaxed. Marcella Cheng/The Conversation NY-BD-CC

Curious Kids: Why do we always fall asleep in cars?

You might be trying to catch up on sleep. Sleep scientists say some children need only nine hours of sleep at night, while others need as much as 11 hours. It depends on the person.
Research reveals two strategies women can use to lower the risks of stillbirth: counting kicks, and sleeping on their left side. (Shutterstock)

Sleeping on your back increases risks of stillbirth

Research suggests that sleeping on your back can increase the chances of stillbirth. Pregnant women need better access to such vital information.
Staying alert and safe on the night shift not only affects workers’ health, but the health and safety of the people around them. from www.shutterstock.com

Power naps and meals don’t always help shift workers make it through the night

Taking a power nap on a night shift can leave you feeling groggy. And eating a large meal can reduce your alertness. So, what's a tired shift worker to do to make it through the night?
Could this be the world’s largest Fitbit? Supplied

Why it’s so important to understand how elephants sleep

By understanding sleep across animals we can gain insights into improving the quality of human sleep. It can also help to bolster conservation management strategies for the animals in question.

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