Articles on Democracy

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The ‘United We Roll’ convoy of semi-trucks travels the highway near Red Deer, Alta., in February 2019 en route to Ottawa to protest what it called a lack of support for the energy sector and stalled pipelines. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jeff McIntosh

Satisfaction with Canada’s democracy declines significantly in Alberta

Determining whether Canadians are gaining or losing confidence in democracy depends in part on which region one is examining. Contrasting trends in Alberta and Québec provide clues.
Indian students of Jamia Millia Islamia University shout slogans as they march during a protest, in New Delhi, India, Dec. 18, 2019. AP Photo/Altaf Qadri

Why is Indian Prime Minister Modi attacking student protesters?

Indian student protests suggest Indian universities have successfully educated youth to participate and lead in public life. For exercising this right, students have been beaten and detained.
Activists and local volunteers meet and console Assamese villagers who might have lost their Indian citizenship. Anuradha Sen Mookerjee

In India’s Assam, a solidarity network has emerged to help those at risk of becoming stateless

As new citizenship law will further discriminate against people on religious basis in India's north-eastern Assam, local activists are uniting across the region to help distressed residents.
Young Americans today are more likely to say that they’re dissatisfied with the current state of affairs. LightField Studios/Shutterstock.com

Why are kids today less patriotic?

A teen asks why so many young people don’t stand for the Pledge of Allegiance or the national anthem. The data shows that young Americans today do view the U.S. more negatively than older generations.
Slogans and soundbites are a key feature of Ghanaian political campaigns. Wikimedia Commons

The role played by soundbites in Ghana’s elections

Considering the competitive nature of party politics in Ghana, campaign strategies that evoke emotion and prepare voters remain one of the priorities of political parties.
Two autocrats: Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan, left, and Hungarian leader Viktor Orban, right, in Budapest, Hungary, Nov. 7, 2019. AP/Presidential Press Service

So you want to be an autocrat? Here’s the 10-point checklist

Today’s autocrats rarely use brute force to wrest control. A human rights and international law scholar details the modern authoritarian's latest methods to grab and hold power.

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