Articles on Heat wave

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The sun sets behind the Statue of Liberty, July 1, 2018. AP Photo/Andres Kudacki, File

Coping with heat waves: 5 essential reads

July is the hottest month in much of North America. Experts explain who is most affected by heat waves and ways to cope with them.
Genetically engineered tobacco plants growing in a greenhouse. Paul South

Helping plants remove natural toxins could boost crop yields by 47 percent

As the climate changes and the population grows, meeting the demand for food will become more difficult as arable land declines. But an international team of scientists has figured out an innovative solution to dramatically bumping up crop yields.
Extreme cold weather in Atlanta, Ga., on Jan. 3, 2018. AP Photo/David Goldman

Climate change and weather extremes: Both heat and cold can kill

Many parts of the US have experienced extreme heat or extreme cold in the past year. Recent research projects that climate change will increase deaths from both types of weather, especially cold spells.
London plane trees, like these in Cadman Park in Brooklyn, New York, are one of the most popular species for shading urban streets. Molybdena

Cities need more than air conditioning to get through heat waves

How can cities protect residents during heat waves? There's no single solution, but expanding air conditioning, installing passive cooling features in homes and planting shade trees all can help.
Children run through an open fire hydrant to cool off during the kickoff of the 2016 Summer Playstreets Program in the Harlem neighborhood of New York, July, 6, 2016. AP Photo/Ezra Kaplan

Heat waves threaten city dwellers, especially minorities and the poor

Climate change is making heat waves more frequent and intense around the world. Cities are hotter than surrounding areas, so urban dwellers – especially minorities and the poor – are at greatest risk.
It might feel nippy, but look out for winter heatwaves. REUTERS/David Gray

Winter warmth is in the forecast (but don’t celebrate yet)

Australia is looking at another mild winter – but while it sounds pleasant, it can increase bushfire risk and worsen drought. Winter heatwaves are actually (enjoyable) extreme weather events.
Flooding in Houston, April 18, 2016. Laurence Simon/Flickr

Has climate change really improved U.S. weather?

Extreme weather has an outsized impact on everyday life. Focusing on average weather patterns may make Americans dangerously complacent about how climate change is already affecting our lives.
Extreme weather could trigger ecosystem collapse, including mass tree deaths. Dead tree image from www.shutterstock.com

Rising extreme weather warns of ecosystem collapse: study

Extreme weather will affect people and animals, as well as whole ecosystems. Research using satellites shows that ecosystems worldwide are vulnerable to collapse.

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