Articles on NASA

Displaying 1 - 20 of 208 articles

Are space twin Scott and Earth twin Mark no longer identical? Robert Markowitz/NASA

Does a year in space make you older or younger?

Before sending humans to Mars or the moon, scientists need to understand what long-term space living does to the human body. Now results are coming in from the Kelly brothers in the TWINS Study,
Anne McClain of NASA runs through procedures in the Soyuz MS-11 spacecraft during a vehicle fit check Nov. 20. NASA/Victor Zelentsov

Female astronauts: How performance products like space suits and bras are designed to pave the way for women’s accomplishments

Designing for women goes beyond just making gear in a size small. By not tailoring equipment and uniforms for women and other underserved people, we prevent them from reaching their full potential.
Minutes after launching the Falcon Heavy rocket, SpaceX was livestreaming footage from the Tesla Roadster it released into space. SpaceX

How SpaceX lowered costs and reduced barriers to space

SpaceX's advances in space technology have reduced barriers to space and changed the direction of American space policy, but it is not without its challenges.
President George H. Bush promotes space exploration during a ceremony marking the 20th anniversary of the flight of Apollo 11 on July 20, 1989. Behind the president are, from left: former astronaut Mike Collins, NASA Administrator Richard Truly, former astronaut Neil Armstrong, Vice President Dan Quayle and former astronaut Buzz Aldrin. AP Photo/Barry Thumma

George H.W. Bush’s overlooked legacy in space exploration

George H.W. Bush's achievements in space are often overlooked but have significantly contributed to America's current space program.
Signs of life on Mars? These are the tracks of NASA’s Curiosity rover exploring the Martian landscape. NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS

Our long fascination with the journey to Mars

Mars has long captured our imagination, from claims of canals to Martian attacks and now our latest NASA exploration to look inside the red planet.
Space debris in Earth orbit creates a dangerous obstacle course for satellites and astronauts. Dotted Yeti / Shutterstock.com

Why space debris cleanup might be a national security threat

Countries developing technology that removes or blasts away space junk may appear to be doing a public service. But those same technologies can destroy military and communications satellites.
Crowds watch as the space shuttle Discovery lifts off from Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Fla. AP Photo/Phil Sandlin

Would a Space Force mean the end of NASA?

The United States already has a space agency: NASA. So why do we need a Space Force, and what would it do? Could a Space Force strain diplomatic relationships, reigniting the race to militarize space?
Those mesmerized by NASA’s accomplishments and ambitions wanted so much more out of the reticent Armstrong. AP Photo

Neil Armstrong and the America that could have been

After the first moon landing, the feelings that propelled a unified national mission quickly dissipated. Could Armstrong have played a bigger role in galvanizing the public for future projects?

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