Articles sur Behavioral economics

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The rewards for doing this usually aren’t monetary. Glenn Koenig/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

Paying all blood donors might not be worth it

Because most people want to be perceived as generous, sometimes monetary incentives for doing a good deed are counterproductive.
Even if the thought counts, the effort might not be worth it. karen roach/Shutterstock.com

Calling donors to thank them doesn’t make them more likely to give again

Like any personal touch, there's a chance this common fundraising step makes people feel warm and fuzzy inside. But a five-year research project found that it doesn't make donors more generous.
People are bad at weighing risk, which is why so many Americans don’t get flu shots. AP Photo/David Goldman

How to deal with life’s risks more rationally

People have to make countless decisions on a daily basis that involve some degree of risk, from boarding a plane to crossing the street. The trouble is most of us don't weigh risk well.
Richard Thaler, laureate in economics, receives his Nobel in Stockholm in December. TT News Agency/Jonas Ekstromer via Reuters

Behavioral economics finally goes mainstream: 4 essential reads

After two Nobel prize wins for behavioral economists, the burgeoning field has demonstrated its importance in shaping effective economic and government policy.
Holidays don’t always bring you closer bokan/Shutterstock.com

Tips from negotiation experts for truly happy holidays

A scholar applies lessons from her research to negotiate with her spouse better and have an 'awesome holiday.' Here's how you can too – and make your family life happier overall.
A product’s calorie label is a common form of nudging behavior. AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin

Do people like government ‘nudges’? Study says: Yes

Government initiatives to prod people to make better decisions got a lot of attention after Richard Thaler won a Nobel in economics for his working on nudging.
A prototype Amazon delivery drone. Amazon.com

Delivery drones: swooping down to prey on our self-control

Amazon.com and others are eager to fill the skies with drones delivering packages at all hours. Convenient, yes, but it could transform – and not in a good way – our ability to make informed choices.
Walt Disney used defaults to get children to eat healthier foods, but not all nudges have consumers’ interests at heart. Gary Kazanjian/AP Photo

‘Default’ choices have big impact, but how to make sure they’re used ethically?

Defaults are powerful tools that policymakers and marketers can use to nudge us to make certain choices, whether in our interest or in theirs. How do we ensure they're used responsibly?

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