Articles sur Hate speech

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The free speech wars rage on but there is an essential difference between free speech and hate speech. Words shape the way we think about the world. (Jason Rosewell/Unsplash)

Confronting hate speech with the geography of freedom

Most Canadians are more than happy to support free speech, believing it to be the foundation of democracy. But for speech to be free it must be aligned to freedom itself.
Social media has become a place of vitriolic myths about Indigenous peoples in the wake of the Gerald Stanley trial for the killing of Colten Boushie. Here, a vigil in support of Colten Boushie’s family on Feb. 13, 2018. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Ryan Remiorz

Social media full of vitriolic myths in the aftermath of the Stanley trial

Social media posts since Gerald Stanley’s acquittal have been saturated with vitriolic rants and myths. If reconciliation is to be more than an aspiration, settlers must acknowledge our culpability.
Indigenous, LGBT, Black and refugee youth are among the groups that are at a greater risk of cyberbullying than others. But youth can also be powerful agents of change. Clarke Sanders/Unsplash

Don’t be a bystander: Five steps to fight cyberbullying

Cyberbullying has become destructive and feels unstoppable. Here is a five-step technique for dealing with it.
Rohingya Muslim women who fled Myanmar for Bangladesh stretch their arms out to collect aid distributed by relief agencies in this September 2017 photo. A campaign of killings, rape and arson attacks by security forces and Buddhist-aligned mobs have sent more than 850,000 of the country’s 1.3 million Rohingya fleeing. (AP Photo/Dar Yasin, File)

Unliked: How Facebook is playing a part in the Rohingya genocide

Facebook is unwittingly helping fuel a genocide against the Rohingya people in Myanmar. Does Cuba’s internet model provide lessons to manage social media amid political chaos?
A man breaks down next to the caskets of three of the six victims of the Quebec City mosque shooting during funeral services in February 2017 in Montreal. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Paul Chiasson

Trump may have emboldened hate in Canada, but it was already here

As Canadians, we shouldn't blame U.S. President Donald Trump for the rise of hatred here. He may have emboldened the so-called alt-right in Canada, but it was flourishing long before his election.
Germany has introduced new legislation to try to stop the rise of online hate speech. It’s a phenomenon that’s happening in Canada too and many analysts point to the impact of Donald Trump’s politics. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

The Trump effect in Canada: A 600 per cent increase in online hate speech

There has been a 600 per cent increase in online hate speech since Nov. 2015. The solution to stop the tide lies in both anti-hate laws and self-awareness education for audiences.
A client whose hair she had been cutting for 20 years came in as usual, and then, without any prompting or preamble, launched into a tirade against Muslims. Shutterstock

The Hanson effect: how hate seeps in and damages us all

In a suburban hair salon, a Muslim woman suddenly feels unwelcome in the country she has loved for 40 years.
Private companies are policing online hate without independent oversight or regulation, which has serious implications and poses risks for basic human rights and freedoms. (Shutterstock)

Why it’s a mistake to celebrate the crackdown on hate websites

After violence in Charlottesville, internet firms are erasing bigoted content. But should private companies serve as unaccountable regulators and be responsible for policing complex social issues?
A man sporting a Nazi tattoo leaves Emancipation Park in Charlottesville, Virginia on Aug. 12, 2017. Steve Helber/AP Photo

Over the years, Americans have become increasingly exposed to extremism

Given recent events, you might have had an inkling that extremist views have been resonating. Researchers from the Center for Peace Studies and Violence Prevention have the hard data to back it up.
Section 18C goes further than the laws of many other democracies by applying to ‘offensive’ and ‘insulting’ speech. AAP/Lukas Coch

We should follow other countries’ lead on hate speech by changing 18C

A minor change, substituting 'vilify' for 'offend' and 'insult', would bring Section 18C more in line with similar laws in other democracies without undermining its effectiveness.

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