Articles sur Honeybees

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Bees live in complex environments, and make lots of decisions every day that are crucial for survival. from www.shutterstock.com

Bees join an elite group of species that understands the concept of zero as a number

The Romans may not have had a symbol for zero, but bees understand what it means beyond just the simple assumption "there's nothing there".
A bee visits an almond flower – an essential process for almond farmers. Tiago J. G. Fernandez/Wikimedia Commons

The farmer wants a hive: inside the world of renting bees

Many fruits, nuts and other crops rely on bees to pollinate their flowers at just the right time of year. Many farmers rent bees to get the job done at pollination time.
Bees living in cities often have to seek out green space like parks, ravines and gardens. Green roofs could offer them some habitat. (Shutterstock)

Bees in the city: Designing green roofs for pollinators

Urban bees deal with what's known as "habitat patches," discontinuous patches of green like gardens, parks and ravines. Green roofs could offer relief to bees dealing with habitat fragmentation.
Tiny hairs cover the bodies of honeybees — including this one dusted in pollen — that allow them to detect molecular “fingerprints” similar to how home security sensors work. (Shutterstock)

How home security resembles dancing honeybees

Bees and home security cameras use the same complex techniques to monitor their environments.
Two papers published today report that neonicotinoids have negative effects on honey bees and wild bees in realistic field experiments. from www.shutterstock.com

Common pesticides can harm bees, but the jury is still out on a global ban

Two large-scale studies confirm that neonicotinoid pesticides can harm bees. But the effects vary widely in different countries, suggesting that calls for a world ban would be premature.
Working bee colonies. Elina L. Nino

Deciphering the mysterious decline of honey bees

Honey bees, which pollinate many valuable crops, are threatened by parasites, pesticides and development. But selective breeding, more benign pesticides and better nutrition could help turn the tide.

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