Articles sur Wildlife conservation

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A new research expedition is documenting the deep-sea denizens of the Perth Canyon, such as this flytrap anemone and basket star. UWA/Schmidt Ocean Institute

We are finally learning the Perth Canyon’s deep-sea secrets

The Perth Canyon, off Australia's west coast, is twice the size of the Grand Canyon. But only now, with the help of remote-controlled submarines, are researchers finding out what lives in its depths.
A ranger looks at the skull of an elephant killed by poachers - a frequent side-effect of development projects that open up remote forests to human access. Ralph Buij

Roads to ruin: the pitfalls of the G20’s infrastructure bonanza

The G20 has pledged to spend more than US$60 trillion on new infrastructure in the next 15 years, much of which will affect pristine areas. Without a solid plan, the environmental toll could be huge.
Hefty problem: a local council was left with a huge clean-up bill after a dead whale washed up in Perth last year. AAP Image/City of Stirling

Dead whales are expensive – whose job is it to clear them up?

Dead whales can cost beachside ratepayers a lot to clean up. The alternative is to tow them away before they wash up - but the legal question of who does the job is far more complex than it sounds.
Monarch butterfly, Danaus plexippus. K. P. McFarlandVermont Center for Ecostudies, www.kpmcfarland.com

Why Monarch butterflies need a helping hand

An iconic North American migration is in jeopardy. The monarch butterfly migrates back and forth from Mexico to Canada every year, its orange and black sails peppering blue skies. In the past 20 years…
Turtles are among the species that could be harmed by dredging, even under the government’s new dredge dumping rules. AAP Image/University of QLD

Six ways Australia is selectively reporting to the UN on the Great Barrier Reef

The Australian government’s latest report on the Great Barrier Reef, submitted to the UNESCO World Heritage Centre last Friday, has been carefully crafted and word-smithed, with many of its claims supported…
It’s tough for humans to get close to an eagle’s nest – but not drones. Richard Griffin

Flying scarecrows and caribou counters: using drones for conservation

Drones, robots and unmanned submarines used to be for military use only. But these days the technology is rapidly advancing and becoming more available for emergency services, farmers, film-makers or the…
Cane toads are still spreading across northern Australia. UNSW

Building fences could stop cane toads in their tracks

Cane toads, introduced in 1935 to control cane beetles, have now spread across a huge swathe of Australia, from the Kimberley in northern Western Australia to northern New South Wales. They’re still spreading…
Feral cats eat tens of millions of native animals in Australia every night. Another Eye

Feral feast: cats kill hundreds of Australian animals

Feral cats are estimated to eat tens of millions of native animals each night in Australia. But what kinds of wildlife are they eating? In research published today in the Journal of Biogeography, my colleagues…
The potential rezoning of Tasmania’s Wilderness World Heritage Area for tourism development begs the question: just what is wilderness, and what is it good for? The Wilderness Society/AAP

Explainer: wilderness, and why it matters

The Tasmanian government this month released a draft of the revised management plan for the Tasmanian Wilderness World Heritage Area, which proposes rezoning certain areas from “wilderness zones” to “remote…
I’ve got worms… nathaninsandiego

Meet the parasitic worm that kills giant pandas

Giant pandas aren’t dying like they used to. In the early 1980s, starvation accounted for more than nine out of ten deaths. However, over the past three decades a parasitic gut worm has replaced that as…
Drones, along with satellites and advanced math, are changing the poaching game. Thomas Snitch

Satellites, mathematics and drones take down poachers in Africa

In 2014, 1,215 rhinos were killed in South Africa for their horns, which end up in Asia as supposed cures for a variety of ailments. An estimated 30,000 African elephants were slaughtered last year for…
Lake Pedder is within Tasmania’s World Heritage Area. Could it benefit from greater tourism development? Romain

Paradise gained – how tourism could help Tasmania’s wilderness

The recent leaking of a new draft management plan for the Tasmanian Wilderness World Heritage Area (TWWHA) has prompted vigorous debate over the merits of tourism development in protected areas. Specifically…
The Bramble Cay melomys - the latest in a long line of extinct Australian mammals. Queensland Government

Another Australian animal slips away to extinction

Last July, the federal environment minister, Greg Hunt, announced the appointment of Gregory Andrews as Australia’s first Threatened Species Commissioner. His mission: to help avert the extinction of a…

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