Artikel-artikel mengenai Cycling

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People use share bikes for many reasons, including health benefits and even because they like the design. Richard Masoner/Bay Area Bike Share launch in San Jose CA/Flickr

Share bikes don’t get cars off the road, but they have other benefits

Urban planners often hope bike-share schemes might reduce reliance on cars and help with congestion. But very few of those who use share bikes have switched from driving.
The settings on traffic lights make pedestrians wait longer by giving higher priority to vehicle traffic. Abaconda Management Group/Wikimedia

How traffic signals favour cars and discourage walking

Everyone doesn't simply wait their turn at traffic lights. Signals are set up to enable a 'green wave' for cars and adjust to heavy traffic, making walkers wait longer no matter how many there are.
Very wet weather is likely to persuade many regular cyclists and walkers to travel instead by car if they can. This is Bondi Junction after a storm hit Sydney. David Moir/AAP

Too wet? Too cold? Too hot? This is how weather affects the trips we make

The relationship between weather and our travel choices is complicated. We can't change the weather, but, with many other factors in play, good policy and design can reduce its impacts.
The ‘Bicycle Snake’ in Copenhagen separates pedestrians and cyclists, allowing both to navigate the city more safely. Cycling Embassy of Denmark/DISSING+WEITLING

Cycling and walking are short-changed when it comes to transport funding in Australia

New analysis reveals just how little is spent on cycling and walking projects around Australia. No state's spending on cycling is more than 1.5% of its road funding.
In both Indian and Australian cities, cyclists who deliver goods and services have to take it slow. Malini Sur

Slow cycling isn’t just for fun – it’s essential for many city workers

Cycling is a low-cost and non-polluting way to make deliveries in congested cities. Slow cyclists should be recognised as good for the economy and environment, not treated like second-class citizens.
Share-bikes can litter our cities and be found in rivers, up trees, in gutters, and strewn around public places. Obikes in unusual places/Facebook

Three reasons why share-bikes don’t fit Australian culture

There are three key cultural reasons why a share-bike business model that could be successful in Singapore is much less likely to be so in Australia.
After nearly a decade of operation, Brisbane’s CityCycle scheme still needs to be subsidised. Ash Kyd/flickr

Here’s what bike-sharing programs need to succeed

Many short-term bike-hiring programs have been launched amid much fanfare, only for their popularity to decline soon after. Several key factors need to be in place for a program to work.

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