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Venezuelans carry buckets filled with water. A power outage that began on March 7 left much of the capital, Caracas, without electricity, running water or public transportation for days. Reuters/Carlos Garcia Rawlins

US pulls diplomats from its embassy in Caracas, and tensions between Venezuela and Brazil escalate

Citing security concerns, the US is evacuating its embassy in Caracas, where President Maduro blames the US for a calamitous power outage. Venezuela's relations with Brazil are eroding quickly, too.
Scorpions used to be a rural problem in Brazil. Now, residents of São Paulo and other urban areas are dealing with an infestation of these venomous creatures. AP Photo/Alexandre Meneghini

Venomous yellow scorpions are moving into Brazil’s big cities – and the infestation may be unstoppable

Brazil's scorpion infestation, which is terrorizing residents of São Paulo and other major cities, is a classic 'wicked problem.' That means officials must think outside-the-box to fix it.
Mauro still has enough money to buy the loyalty of Venezuela’s military — but his government is going bankrupt, so that will change. Reuters/Handout

Odds of military coup in Venezuela rise every day Maduro stays in office

A coup seems so imminent in Venezuela that people are debating whether Maduro's overthrow would be good or bad for Venezuelan democracy. But history suggests a coup may be less likely than it seems.
After 48 hours of frantic effort, Brazilian rescue workers have called off their search for survivors at a collapsed dam in Minas Gerais state. AP Photo/Leo Correa

Dam collapse at Brazilian mine exposes grave safety problems

Nearly 1,800 Brazilian dams are at risk of failure, according to the government. Fixing them is expensive – but ignoring aging dams can have considerable social, economic and environmental costs.
Munduruku tribal people are demanding that Brazil’s government respect their land rights. AP Photo/Eraldo Peres

Amazon deforestation, already rising, may spike under Bolsonaro

Brazil's new president could clear the way for plans to develop remote areas around the Tapajos River basin over the objections of the indigenous people who live there.
An anti-government protester covers her face with a Venezuelan flag, and uses toothpaste around her eyes to help lessen the effect of tear gas, during clashes with security forces after a rally demanding the resignation of President Nicolas Maduro in Caracas, Venezuela. (AP Photo/Fernando Llano)

Canada’s disturbing indifference to the plight of Venezuelans

Canada has been considered a human rights champion when it comes to accepting Syrian refugees. So why is it doing next to nothing for those fleeing Venezuela?
Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro at his swearing-in ceremony at the Supreme Court in Caracas, Venezuela, Thursday, Jan. 10, 2019. AP Photo/Ariana Cubillos

Venezuelans reject Maduro presidency — but most would oppose foreign military operation to oust him

Maduro, who was sworn in for his second term on Jan. 10, has rigged elections, jailed rivals and plunged Venezuela into crisis. But Trump's proposed 'military option' to remove him remains unpopular.
Bolsonaro supporters celebrate outside his home in Rio de Janeiro after exit polls on Oct. 28 declared him the preliminary winner of Brazil’s 2018 presidential election. AP Photo/Leo Correa

Bolsonaro wins Brazil election, promises to purge leftists from country

Jair Bolsonaro, a right-wing congressman and former army captain, is Brazil's next president, with 56 percent of votes. Critics see a threat to democracy in his scathing attacks on Brazilian society.

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